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Hillary Clinton’s Flip Flop On Immigration Shows Hispandering

Strange thing happened last week, Hillary Clinton in a matter of 24 hours flip-flopped on the 2008 immigration law for trafficking victims.

On NPR with John Harwood, she said she was open to changing the 2008 law. However the next day in front of Univision’s Jorge Ramos, she switched her stance and said she does not support changes to the 2008 law.

Hispandering?

If you are reporting on this story, please see the following statement from the RNC:

“Hillary Clinton wins today’s flip-flopper award in her latest attempt to hispander. It’s disingenuous for her to change her tune on the 2008 immigration law, within 24 hours, especially when speaking to a Hispanic journalist who serves a large Hispanic viewership. Hillary Clinton’s book tour is revealing she will say just about anything to connect with the American people but her pandering will continue to take its toll on her.” – Izzy Santa, RNC spokesperson

http://rncresearch.tumblr.com/post/93120236350/two-days-two-different-responses-to-the-border-crisis

Two Days, Two Different Responses To The Border Crisis From Clinton

On July 24th, During An Interview With NPR, Clinton Claimed She Was Open To Changing A 2008 Law In Response To The Border Crisis, Saying “I Think It Should Be Looked At As Part Of An Overall Package.” QUESTION: “Jeb Bush, former governor of Florida, is out with an op-ed calling for comprehensive immigration reform as you do, but saying that the law his brother signed, which passed when you were in the Senate in 2008, ought to be changed to make it easier to send those other than the “deserving few” back to their home countries in Central America. Should that law be changed?” CLINTON: “I think it should be looked at as part of an overall package. We have two categories of people that are represented by these poor children that have come across our border. We have migrants, children who are leaving for a variety of reasons — economic, they want to reunite with family members. And we have refugees, people who have reason to be threatened, people who have bad probabilities if they return home as to what might happen to them.” (NPR’s “On Point,” 7/24/14)

  • Clinton: “Our Laws Right Now Are Not Particularly Well-Suited For Making The Kind Of Determinations That Are Required, And That We Should, As Americans, Want To See Happen.” CLINTON: “So we do need more resources very quickly deployed, which is what the president and the Democrats have asked for. We need some flexibility within the laws. Our laws right now are not particularly well-suited for making the kind of determinations that are required, and that we should, as Americans, want to see happen.” (NPR’s “On Point,” 7/24/14)

On July 25th, During An Interview With Jorge Ramos, Clinton Switched Her Position, Claiming She Doesn’t “Agree That We Should Change The Law.” RAMOS: “Should we change the 2008 law? For quick deportations–”CLINTON: “No, I don’t agree that we should change the law. No, that’s why I’m advocating an appropriate procedure, well-funded by the Congress, which they are resisting doing, so that we can make individual decisions.” (Fusion’s “America With Jorge Ramos,” 7/25/14)