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Americans Can’t Afford Obama’s Affordable Health Care Act

- July 14, 2017

Obamacare Was Sold As A Way To Make Health Care Affordable, But Costs For American Families Have Skyrocketed


TOP TAKEAWAYS

  • In 2009, Democrats tried to sell Obamacare to the American people by saying the law would make health care affordable.
  • Since then, national annual spending on health care has increased dramatically--over $700 billion.
  • The total annual cost of health care for a family of four has increased nearly $9,000 since 2010. 
  • Spending on prescription drugs has increased at a faster rate than overall health care spending, and the average cost to a patient for brand prescriptions filled through a commercial plan has increased more than 25 percent since 2010.

IN AN ATTEMPT TO LOWER HEALTH CARE COSTS, CONGRESSIONAL DEMOCRATS PASSED OBAMACARE

In 2009, Democrats Began Their Overhaul Of The Health Care System

In November 2009, The House Of Representatives Passed Their Health Care Bill By A Vote Of 220-215. "The House of Representatives on Saturday night passed a sweeping health care bill by a vote of 220-215." (Dana Bash, et al., "House Passes Health Care Reform Bill," CNN, 11/8/09)

In December, The Senate Passed Their Health Care Reform Bill By A Vote Of 60-39 With "Every Republican Opposed [To] It." "The Senate passed a historic $871 billion health care reform bill Thursday morning, handing President Obama a Christmas Eve victory on his top domestic priority. The bill passed in a 60-39 party line vote after months of heated partisan debate. Every member of the Democratic caucus backed the measure; every Republican opposed it." (Alan Silverleib, "Senate Approves Health Care Reform Bill," CNN , 12/24/09)

Key Democrats Claimed That The Affordable Care Act Would Lower Costs

In 2010, Former President Barack Obama Claimed That The Bill Would "Bend The Cost Curve And Start Actually Reducing Health Care Costs." PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: "And everybody who's looked at it says that every single good idea to bend the cost curve and start actually reducing health care costs are in this bill." (President Barack Obama, Remarks To House Democrats , Washington DC, 3/20/10)

In 2010, Senate Minority Leader Senator Chuck Schumer (D-NY) Claimed That The Health Care Bill Would Be The First "Major Step" In Managing The "Costs That Are Out Of Control." SEN. SCHUMER: "You bet. And that's why it's been crafted the way it is, to be realistic. But some of the cost-cutting will go into effect right away. Everyone knows the waste, the fraud, the abuse, the duplication in the system. The answer on the other side is do nothing, repeal it. We have to get a handle on costs. And for me, at least, the number one rationale for this bill--I think it's important to cover people--but the most important thing to do is get a handle on the costs that are out of control, that are killing business, killing individuals, and killing our federal deficit. Does this do everything in that regard? No. Is it the first major step to do it in a very large way? You bet." (NBC's Meet The Press , 3/28/10)

In 2013, House Minority Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) Once Claimed That The Affordable Care Act Was "Bringing The Cost Of Health Care In Our Country Down." REP. NANCY PELOSI: "Many of the initiatives that he passed are what are coming to bear now, including the Affordable Care Act. The Affordable Care Act is bringing the cost of health care in our country down in both the public and private sector." (Becky Bowers, "Nancy Pelosi Says Obamacare Is Bringing Down Health Care Costs," Politifact , 5/16/13)

Among The Democrats That Claimed Obamacare Would Lower Costs Are Senators That Represent States President Trump Won

Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) Claimed That Democrats Would "Reduce Long-Term Costs, Lower The Deficit And Reduce Long Term-Spending." SEN. DEBBIE STABENOW: "In fact, one of the biggest ways we will save money is by focusing on keeping people healthy, focusing on ways that we change a system so we are not paying for individual procedures, but paying for those things the doctor needs to do and wants to do in total to help you recover from an operation or have the treatment you need. We are going to, importantly, reduce long-term costs, lower the deficit and reduce long-term spending." (Sen. Debbie Stabenow, Congressional Record , 11/19/09, p. S11587)

Senator Tammy Baldwin (D-WI) Claimed That The Affordable Care Act Would "Lower Costs And Extend Coverage To All." SEN. TAMMY BALDWIN: "Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of this bill, which will provide affordable health coverage to 36 million people who lack it today…Today, we convene to debate and advance legislation that delivers meaningful insurance reform, outlawing outrageous insurance abuses, lowering costs, and extending coverage to all. I will cast my vote today on behalf of the people in Wisconsin and millions throughout America who have said enough is enough. Today, we declare with conviction: every American deserves health care, and every American shall have it." (Sen. Tammy Baldwin, Congressional Record , 11/07/09, p. H12843)

Senator Bob Casey Jr. (D-PA) Claimed That Health Reform Would "Lower Costs" And "Control Long-Term Health Care." SEN. BOB CASEY JR: "We are going to make the changes and institute reforms that will lead to lower costs, better health care outcomes, and a better bottom line for small businesses and, therefore, control long-term health care costs and long-term national debt. All of that comes from a good health care bill in the end." (Sen. Bob Casey Jr, Congressional Record , 11/4/09, p.S11113)

Senator Sherrod Brown (D-OH) Claimed That The Passage Of The Senate Health Care Bill Would "Lower Costs For Middle Class Families With Insurance" And That Seniors On Medicare Will See "Prescription Drug Costs Cut In Half." "'This bill will lower costs for middle class families with insurance, while providing help to 31 million Americans who lack it… Seniors on Medicare will see their prescription drug costs cut in half and, for the first time, will have access to free annual check-ups and screenings." (Press Release, "Sen. Brown Statement On Senate Passage Of Health Reform Legislation," Sen. Sherrod Brown , 12/24/09)

Senator Bill Nelson (D-FL) Believed That The Senate Health Care Bill Would Make "Health Coverage More Affordable" And That This Bill Specifically Would "Provide More Affordable Coverage For Millions Of Uninsured Americans." "'In voting to move a health-care bill forward, my main goal was to help pass legislation that'll make health coverage more affordable and available for everybody… And when it comes to health care reform, we can't afford to sit by and do nothing anymore. I firmly believe this legislation will provide more affordable coverage for millions of uninsured Americans, prevent insurance companies from dropping folks who get sick and stop them from denying coverage for pre-existing conditions.'" (Press Release, "Sen. Bill Nelson's Statement On Health-Care Vote," Sen. Bill Nelson , 12/21/09)

Senator Jon Tester (D-MT) Stated That He Voted In Favor Of Obamacare Because It'll "Make Insurance Affordable For All Americans." "'This morning I voted to keep the government out of our health care decisions while making insurance affordable for all Americans."(Press Release, "Tester Statement On Passage Of Health Care Reform Bill," Sen. Jon Tester , 12/24/09)

Senator Claire McCaskill (D-MO) Declared That The Senate Healthcare Bill Would "Mak[e] Insurance More Affordable." "McCaskill said the bill is not perfect but will 'vastly improve the current realities of health care in our country' by stabilizing health care costs, making insurance more affordable and available to most Americans and by reducing the deficit over 20 years." ("State's Senators, Candidates Follow Party Lines On Health Care Bill," Springfield News-Leader, 12/24/09)

OBAMACARE HAS FAILED TO BRING DOWN THE COST OF HEALTH CARE

Various Reports Have Shown That Health Care Spending Has Increased Dramatically

In 2009, The National Health Expenditure Was $2.5 Trillion But Has Since Steadily Increased To $3.2 Trillion. ("Health, United States, 2016, With Chartbook On Long-Term Trends In Health," Centers For Disease Control And Prevention , Accessed 7/13/17, p. 314)

The Centers For Medicare And Medicaid Services Has Predicted That Health Spending Will Grow 1.2 Percentage Points Faster Than The Gross Domestic Product Between The Years Of 2016-2025. "Health spending is projected to grow 1.2 percentage points faster than Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per year over the 2016-25 period; as a result, the health share of GDP is expected to rise from 17.8 percent in 2015 to 19.9 percent by 2025." ("National Health Expenditure Projections 2016-2025 Forecast Summary," Centers For Medicare And Medicaid Services , Accessed 7/12/17)

The Average Cost Of Health Care For A Family Of Four Has Increased Consistently Since 2010

In 2010, The Average Cost Of Health Care For A Typical Family Of Four Was $18,074. "The total 2010 medical cost for a typical American family of four is $18,074. Compared to the 2009 amount of $16,771, this is an increase of 7.8%." ("2010 Milliman Medical Index," Milliman Inc. , Accessed 7/13/17, p. 1)

In 2011, The Average Cost Of Health Care For A Typical Family Of Four Increased To $19,393. "The annual Milliman Medical Index (MMI) measures the total cost of healthcare for a typical family of four covered by a preferred provider plan (PPO). The 2011 MMI cost is $19,393, an increase of $1,319, or 7.3% over 2010." (Christopher S. Girod, Lorraine W. Mayne, Scott A. Weltz, "2011 Milliman Medical Index," Milliman Inc. , 5/11/11)

In 2012, The Average Cost Of Health Care For A Typical Family Of Four Increased To $20,728. "The annual Milliman Medical Index (MMI) measures the total cost of healthcare for a typical family of four covered by a preferred provider organization (PPO) plan. The 2012 MMI cost is $20,728, an increase of $1,335, or 6.9% over 2011." (Christopher S. Girod, Lorraine W. Mayne, and Scott A. Weltz, "2012 Milliman Medical Index," Milliman Inc. , 5/15/12)

In 2013, The Average Cost Of Health Care For A Typical American Family Of Four Was $22,030. "As measured by the 2013 MMI, the total annual cost of healthcare for a typical family of four covered by an employer-sponsored preferred provider plan (PPO) is $22,030." (Christopher S. Girod, Lorraine W. Mayne, and Scott A. Weltz, "2013 Milliman Medical Index," Milliman Inc. , 5/20/13)

In 2014, The Average Cost Of Health Care For A Typical American Family Of Four Increased To $23,215. "$23,215. That's how much is spent in 2014 on healthcare for a typical American family of four covered by an average employer-sponsored health plan according to the 2014 Milliman Medical Index (MMI)." (Christopher S. Girod, Susan K. Hart, Lorraine W. Mayne, And Scott A. Weltz, "2014 Milliman Medical Index," Milliman Inc. , 5/20/14)

In 2015, The Average Cost Of Health Care For A Typical American Family Of Four Increased To $24,671. "In 2015, the cost of healthcare for a typical American family of four covered by an average employer-sponsored preferred provider organization (PPO) plan is $24,671 (see Figure 1) according to the Milliman Medical Index (MMI)." (Christopher S. Girod, Susan K. Hart, and Scott A. Weltz, "2015 Milliman Medical Index," Milliman Inc. , 5/19/15)

In 2016 The Average Cost Of Health Care For A Typical American Family Of Four Increased To $25,826. "In 2016, the cost of healthcare for a typical American family of four covered by an average employer-sponsored preferred provider organization (PPO) plan is $25,826 (see Figure 1), according to the Milliman Medical Index (MMI)." (Chris Girod, Sue Hart, and Scott Weltz, "2016 Milliman Medical Index," Milliman Inc. , Accessed 7/13/17)

In 2017, The Average Cost Of Health Care For A Typical American Family Of Four Increased To $26,944. "In 2017, the cost of healthcare for a typical American family of four covered by an average employer-sponsored preferred provider organization (PPO) plan is $26,944 (see Figure 1), according to the Milliman Medical Index (MMI)." (Christopher S. Girod, Susan K. Hart, and Scott A. Weltz, "2017 Milliman Medical Index," Milliman Inc.," 5/16/17)

Spending On Prescription Drugs Has Increased More Rapidly Than Overall Health Spending

According To A Report By The U.S. Department Of Health And Human Services, Expenditures On Prescription Drugs Rose Faster Than Overall Health Spending. "Expenditures on prescription drugs are rising and are projected to continue to rise faster than overall health spending thereby increasing this sector's share of health care spending." ("Observations On Trends In Prescription Drug Spending," The U.S. Department Of Health And Human Services , 3/8/16)

Expenditures On Specialty Drugs Have Risen Even "More Rapidly" Than Expenditures On Other Drugs. "Expenditures on specialty drugs generally appear to be rising more rapidly than expenditures on other drugs, though estimates of specialty drug expenditures are highly sensitive to which drugs are considered 'specialty' products." ("Observations On Trends In Prescription Drug Spending," The U.S. Department Of Health And Human Services , 3/8/16)

The Average Cost To A Patient For Brand Prescriptions Filled Through A Commercial Plan Increased More Than 25 Percent Since 2010. "'The average patient cost exposure for brand prescriptions filled through a commercial plan has increased more than 25 percent since 2010, reaching $44 per prescription' in 2015, an IMS Health study reported earlier this year." (Brad Tuttle, "Here's What Happened To Health Care Costs In America In The Obama Years," Time , 10/4/16)

  • Now In 2017, It Is Predicted That Prescription Drug Costs Would Jump 11.6 Percent. "Prescription drug costs for Americans under 65 years old are projected to jump 11.6 percent in 2017, or at a quicker pace than the 11.3 percent price increase in 2016, according to consulting firm Segal Consulting." (Aime Picchi, "Prognosis For Rx In 2017: More Painful Drug-Price Hikes," CBS News , 12/30/16)

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