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Clinton = Weak On North Korea

- January 17, 2016

North Korea Said It “Successfully Carried Out A Hydrogen Bomb Test, Which If Confirmed, Will Be A First For The Reclusive Regime And A Significant Advancement For Its Military Ambitions.” “North Korea says it has successfully carried out a hydrogen bomb test, which if confirmed, will be a first for the reclusive regime and a significant advancement for its military ambitions. A hydrogen bomb is more powerful than plutonium weapons, which is what North Korea used in its three previous underground nuclear tests.” (Euan McKirdy, “North Korea Announces It Conducted Nuclear Test,” CNN, 1/6/16)

“North Korea Has Expanded A Uranium Enrichment Facility And Restarted A Plutonium Reactor That Could Begin Recovering Material For Nuclear Weapons In Weeks Or Months…” “North Korea has expanded a uranium enrichment facility and restarted a plutonium reactor that could begin recovering material for nuclear weapons in weeks or months, Clapper said in delivering the annual assessment by intelligence agencies of the top dangers facing the country.” (Deb Riechmann and Richard Lardner, “Intelligence Officials: IS Determined To Strike US This Year,” The Associated Press, 2/9/16)

Intelligence Analysts Believe That North Korea “Probably” Possesses A Miniaturized Nuclear Warhead. “Some U.S. intelligence analysts now believe that North Korea "probably" possesses a miniaturized nuclear warhead, several U.S. officials told CNN. The assessment has yet to become a formal consensus view of the U.S. government. But it reveals just how far along many in the U.S. believe the reclusive country has come to gaining a nuclear-tipped ballistic missile that could potentially strike the U.S. As North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's public rhetoric has escalated in recent weeks, concern has grown inside intelligence circles that he has made progress on several fronts.” (Barbara Starr and Ryan Browne, “Intel Officials: North Korea ‘Probably’ Has Miniaturized Nuke,” CNN, 3/24/16)

Clinton "Simply Put Off" North Korea's Nuclear Program While It Grew On Her Watch

"Other Pressing Issues, Such As North Korea's Nuclear Program, [Clinton] Simply Put Off." "Indeed, Clinton consistently avoided getting her hands dirty with direct mediation. She happily agreed to leave key negotiations in crisis spots to special envoys, charging George Mitchell with overseeing the Israeli-Palestinian portfolio and relying on Richard Holbrooke to bring about a political settlement in Afghanistan and Pakistan. She rarely stepped in as each of them failed to make much headway. Other pressing issues, such as North Korea's nuclear program, she simply put off." (Michael Hirsh, "The Clinton Legacy," Foreign Affairs, May/June 2013)

  • Clinton's Policy Of "Strategic Patience" With North Korea "Did Not Work." "Other pressing issues, such as North Korea's nuclear program, she simply put off. Her policy of 'strategic patience' with North Korea, under which Washington refused to offer any new incentives to Pyongyang in the hopes of restarting nuclear disarmament talks, did not work. The problem festered for four years, and as soon as Clinton left office, the North Korean leader Kim Jong Un greeted her successor with yet another nuclear test." (Michael Hirsh, "The Clinton Legacy," Foreign Affairs, May/June 2013)

In April 2009, North Korea Launched A Multistage Rocket. "Defying weeks of international pressure, North Korea launched a multistage rocket today, a move that the U.S. and its allies fear masked a test of its ability to deliver nuclear weapons." (John M. Glionna, "North Korea Launches Rocket," The Los Angeles Times, 4/5/09)

  • The North Korean Government Claimed It Was For A Satellite Launch, But Some Analysts Said Their Rocket Could Deliver A Warhead To The Western U.S. "Pyongyang had said it planned to put a communications satellite into space. But many analysts predicted that the launch would be a test of the regime's ability to deliver a warhead with the three-stage Taepodong 2, which is estimated to have a range of more than 4,000 miles. Some analysts say that with a light payload, it could reach the western U.S." (John M. Glionna, "North Korea Launches Rocket," The Los Angeles Times, 4/5/09)

In May 2009, North Korea Announced It "Successfully Conducted" A Second Nuclear Test, "Defying International Warnings." "North Korea announced on Monday that it had successfully conducted its second nuclear test, defying international warnings and dramatically raising the stakes in a global effort to get the recalcitrant Communist state to give up its nuclear weapons program." (Choe Sang-Hun, "North Korea Claims To Conduct Second Nuclear Test," The New York Times, 5/24/09)

In December 2010, The Obama Administration "Concluded That North Korea's New Plant To Enrich Nuclear Fuel Uses Technology That Is 'Significantly More Advanced'" Than Iran's Program. "The Obama administration has concluded that North Korea's new plant to enrich nuclear fuel uses technology that is 'significantly more advanced' than what Iran has struggled over two decades to assemble, according to senior administration and intelligence officials." (David E. Sanger and William J. Broad, "U.S. Concludes N. Korea Has More Nuclear Sites," The New York Times, 12/14/10)

  • "These Conclusions Strongly Suggest That North Korea Has Evaded Layers Of Economic Sanctions And Efforts To Intercept Sea And Air Shipments…" "These conclusions strongly suggest that North Korea has evaded layers of economic sanctions and efforts to intercept sea and air shipments, an effort begun in the Bush administration and accelerated after a United Nations Security Council resolution passed last year after the North's second nuclear test." (David E. Sanger and William J. Broad, "U.S. Concludes N. Korea Has More Nuclear Sites," The New York Times, 12/14/10)

In November 2011, North Korea "Reported Brisk Progress In Building A New Nuclear Reactor And Producing Enriched Uranium," Which Marked "The Latest Sign That North Korea [Was] Pressing Ahead With Its Nuclear Program." "North Korea reported brisk progress in building a new nuclear reactor and producing enriched uranium on Wednesday. Although the statement appeared to invite international inspectors to verify that the facilities are for peaceful purposes, it was the latest sign that North Korea is pressing ahead with its nuclear program." (Choe Sang-Hun, "North Korea Reports Progress On New Reactor," The New York Times, 11/30/11)

In April 2012, North Korea Had A Failed Rocket Launch Attempt, Which Marked "The End Of The Obama Administration's Year-Long Effort" To Engage The Rogue State. "North Korea's apparently unsuccessful launch of an Unha-3 rocket with a 'satellite' attached marks not only the 100th birthday of the country's founder Kim Il Sung, but also the end of the Obama administration's year-long effort to open up a new path for negotiations with the Hermit Kingdom. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton warned earlier Thursday that the promised launch by North Korea would scuttle the deal the Obama administration negotiated with Pyongyang and announced on Leap Day Feb. 29, which would have provided North Korea with 240,000 tons of U.S. food assistance over the next year. She lamented that the North Koreans had thrown away the progress made." (Josh Rogin, "North Korean Missile Launch Torpedoes Obama's Engagement Strategy," Foreign Policy, 4/12/12)

In May 2012, "Resumed Construction Of A Nuclear Reactor That Can Be Used To Expand The Country's Nuclear Weapons Program." "North Korea has resumed construction of a nuclear reactor that can be used to expand the country's nuclear weapons program, an American-based institute said Thursday, citing the latest satellite imagery of the building site. In November, North Korea reported brisk progress in the building of a small light water reactor in its main nuclear complex in Yongbyon, north of Pyongyang, its capital. If completed and operational, the plant would give North Korea a new source of spent nuclear fuel from which plutonium, a fuel for nuclear weapons, can be extracted." (Choe Sang-Hun, "North Korea Said To Resume Work On Nuclear Reactor," The New York Times , 5/17/12)

In December 2012, "Surprised And Angered The International Community…By Launching A Long-Range Rocket." "North Korea surprised and angered the international community Wednesday by launching a long-range rocket that may have put an object in orbit. The secretive North Korean regime said the rocket had successfully blasted off from a space center on its west coast and claimed the satellite it was carrying had entered its intended orbit. The launch followed a botched attempt in April and came just days after Pyongyang suggested it could be delayed." (Jethro Mullen and Paul Armstrong, "North Korea Carries Out Controversial Rocket Launch," CNN, 12/12/12)

  • "Many Nations, Such As The United States And South Korea, Consider The Launch To Be A Cover For Testing Ballistic Missile Technology." "Many nations, such as the United States and South Korea, consider the launch to be a cover for testing ballistic missile technology. The nuclear-armed North has insisted its aim was to place a scientific satellite in space." (Jethro Mullen and Paul Armstrong, "North Korea Carries Out Controversial Rocket Launch," CNN, 12/12/12)

As Secretary, Clinton Refused To Add North Korea Back To The State Sponsors Of Terrorism List

Clinton On Adding North Korea Back To The State Sponsors Of Terrorism List, May 2010: "The United States Will Apply The Law As The Facts Warrant. … If The Evidence Warrants, The Department Of State Will Take Action." QUESTION: "Secretary Clinton, on North and South Korea, can you specify precisely what kinds of things the U.S. Government will look at as it studies policies and authority regarding North Korea? Are you, for example, specifically looking at the possibility of putting them back on the state-sponsor of terrorism list? … CLINTON: "Well, Arshad, we are obviously continuing to review and consult closely on these matters, some of which are quite sensitive. And I look forward to discussing them in depth when I am in Seoul on Wednesday. We will provide additional details at the appropriate time. With respect to your specific question about the state-sponsor of terrorism list, the United States will apply the law as the facts warrant. The legislation, as you know, sets out specific criteria for the Secretary of State to base a determination. And the Department of State continually reviews North Korea's actions to determine if the evidence supports its designation as a state sponsor of terrorism. If the evidence warrants, the Department of State will take action." (Hillary Clinton, Remarks, Beijing, China, 5/24/10)

  • Clinton: "The Legislation, As You Know, Sets Out Specific Criteria For The Secretary Of State To Base A Determination." (Hillary Clinton, Remarks, Beijing, China, 5/24/10)

"What Clinton Is Saying Here Is That The Original Reasons That North Korea Was Put On The List…Are Not Enough To Justify Putting Pyongyang Back On The List Today." "What Clinton is saying here is that the original reasons that North Korea was put on the list, when they blew up half the South Korean cabinet in Rangoon in 1983 and then bombed Korean Air Flight 858 in 1987, are not enough to justify putting Pyongyang back on the list today. Nor are the other reasons that the State Department has included in reports as recently as 2007 good enough for relisting now, namely that North Korea still hasn't answered for 12 Japanese abductees and still harbors members of the Japanese Red Army." (Josh Rogin, "Why The State Department Won't Put North Korea Back On The Terror List," Foreign Policy, 5/25/10)


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