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New ObamaCare Survey Shows Increasing Out Of Pocket Costs

- September 14, 2016

Employee Premiums And Deductibles Are On The Rise In 2016

Annual Family Premiums For Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance Rose An Average Of 3 Percent To $18,142 For This Year, While Wages Only Grew By 2.5 Percent. "Annual family premiums for employer-sponsored health insurance rose an average of 3 percent to $18,142 this year, a modest increase at a time when workers' wages (2.5%) and inflation (1.1%) also grew modestly, according to the benchmark Kaiser Family Foundation/Health Research & Educational Trust (HRET) 2016 Employer Health Benefits Survey released today." ("Average Annual Workplace Family Health Premiums Rise Modest 3% to $18,142 in 2016; More Workers Enroll in High-Deductible Plans With Savings Option Over Past Two Years," The Kaiser Family Foundation , 9/14/16)

"The Average Premium For Single Coverage In 2016 Is $536 Per Month, Or $6,435 Per Year. The Average Premium For Family Coverage Is $1,512 Per Month Or $18,142 Per Year." ("2016 Employer Health Benefits Survey," The Kaiser Family Foundation, 9/14/16)

"The $18,142 Average Family Premium In 2016 Is 20% Higher Than The Average Family Premium In 2011 And 58% Higher Than The Average Family Premium In 2006." ("2016 Employer Health Benefits Survey," The Kaiser Family Foundation, 9/14/16)

"The Average Worker Contributions For Single And Family Coverage Have Increased 80% And 78%, Respectively, Over The Last 10 Years, And 23% And 28%, Respectively, Over The Last Five Years." ("2016 Employer Health Benefits Survey," The Kaiser Family Foundation, 9/14/16)

For The First Time, More Than Half Of All Insured Employees Face A Deductible Of At Least $1,000. "For the first time, the survey also finds half (51%) of all covered workers face deductibles of at least $1,000 annually for single coverage." ("Average Annual Workplace Family Health Premiums Rise Modest 3% to $18,142 in 2016; More Workers Enroll in High-Deductible Plans With Savings Option Over Past Two Years," The Kaiser Family Foundation , 9/14/16)

In 2016, 86 Percent Of Covered Workers Saw Deductibles Increase By An Average Of $159, Or 12 Percent. "In 2016, 83 percent of covered workers face a deductible for single coverage, which averages $1,478. That's up $159 or 12 percent from 2015, and $486 or 49 percent since 2011." ("Average Annual Workplace Family Health Premiums Rise Modest 3% to $18,142 in 2016; More Workers Enroll in High-Deductible Plans With Savings Option Over Past Two Years," The Kaiser Family Foundation , 9/14/16)

  • Since 2011, Average Worker Deductibles Have Risen 49 Percent. "In 2016, 83 percent of covered workers face a deductible for single coverage, which averages $1,478. That's up $159 or 12 percent from 2015, and $486 or 49 percent since 2011." (Average Annual Workplace Family Health Premiums Rise Modest 3% to $18,142 in 2016; More Workers Enroll in High-Deductible Plans With Savings Option Over Past Two Years, The Kaiser Family Foundation , 9/14/16)

A Large Share Of Workers Face Out Of Pocket Costs Regardless Of Deductibles. "Whether they face a general annual deductible or not, a large share of covered workers also pay a portion of the cost when they visit a physician. For primary care, 67% of covered workers face a copayment (a fixed dollar amount) when they visit a doctor and 25% face coinsurance (a percentage of the covered amount). For specialty care, 66% face a copayment and 26% face coinsurance. The average in-network copayments are $24 for primary care and $38 for specialty care. The average in-network coinsurance is 18% for primary and 19% for specialty care." ("2016 Employer Health Benefits Survey," The Kaiser Family Foundation, 9/14/16)

64 Percent Of Workers Have A Coinsurance For Hospital Admission, While 14 Percent Have A Copayment. "Most workers also face additional cost sharing for a hospital admission or an outpatient surgery episode. After any general annual deductible is met, 64% of covered workers have a coinsurance and 14% have a copayment for hospital admissions." ("2016 Employer Health Benefits Survey," The Kaiser Family Foundation, 9/14/16)

  • The Average Coinsurance Payment For Hospital Admissions Is 19% While The Average Copayment Is $282. "The average coinsurance rate for hospital admissions is 19%. The average copayment is $282 per hospital admission, the average per diem charge is $281, and the average separate annual hospital deductible is $898. The cost sharing provisions for outpatient surgery follow a similar pattern to those for hospital admissions; most covered workers have either coinsurance (66%) or copayments (17%). For covered workers with cost sharing for outpatient surgery, the average coinsurance rate is 19% and the average copayment is $170." ("2016 Employer Health Benefits Survey," The Kaiser Family Foundation, 9/14/16)

Single Coverage Deductibles Have Skyrocketed Since 2011 By An Average 63 Percent. ("Average Annual Workplace Family Health Premiums Rise Modest 3% to $18,142 in 2016; More Workers Enroll in High-Deductible Plans With Savings Option Over Past Two Years," The Kaiser Family Foundation , 9/14/16)

(Average Annual Workplace Family Health Premiums Rise Modest 3% to $18,142 in 2016; More Workers Enroll in High-Deductible Plans With Savings Option Over Past Two Years, The Kaiser Family Foundation , 9/14/16)

The Survey Also Shows That ObamaCare Is Unfairly Burdening Small Businesses And Their Employees

The Percentages Of Smaller Firms (10 To 49 Workers) Offering Coverage, However, Has Fallen Since 2011 And Years Before. ("2016 Employer Health Benefits Survey," The Kaiser Family Foundation, 9/14/16)

Only 46 Percent Of Businesses With 3-9 Employees Offer Health Insurance. The likelihood of offering health benefits differs significantly by firm size, with only 46% of employers with 3 to 9 workers offering coverage while virtually all employers with 1,000 or more workers offer coverage." ("2016 Employer Health Benefits Survey," The Kaiser Family Foundation, 9/14/16)

"The Cost Of Health Insurance Remains The Primary Reason Cited By Firms For Not Offering Health Benefits. " "The cost of health insurance remains the primary reason cited by firms for not offering health benefits. Among small firms not offering health benefits, 34% cite high cost as "the most important reason" for not doing so, followed by "employees are generally covered under another plan" (24%) (Exhibit 2.17). Relatively few small employers indicate that they do not offer because they believe that employees will get a better deal on the health insurance exchanges (1%)."("2016 Employer Health Benefits Survey," The Kaiser Family Foundation, 9/14/16)

70 Percent Of Small Businesses With 50 Or Fewer Full Time Employees That Looked Into Purchasing Employee Care On An ObamaCare SHOP Exchange Opted Not To Due Plans Being Too Expensive. "Among Non-Offering Firms With 50 Or Fewer FTEs That Looked At Coverage But Chose Not To Purchase On A SHOP Exchange, 70% Reported They Did Not Do So Because The Plans Were Too Expensive." ("2016 Employer Health Benefits Survey," The Kaiser Family Foundation, 9/14/16)

Employees At Small Businesses Offering Health Insurance Still Face Numerous Obstacles To Obtaining Coverage. "Even when firms do offer health benefits, not all of their workers are covered there. Some workers are not eligible to enroll (e.g., waiting periods or part-time or temporary work status) and others who are eligible choose not to enroll (e.g., they feel the coverage is too expensive or they are covered through another source)." ("2016 Employer Health Benefits Survey," The Kaiser Family Foundation, 9/14/16)

ObamaCare Deductibles Are More Expensive For Small Business Employees. "The average deductible for workers who face one is higher for workers in small firms (three to 199 employers) than in large firms ($2,069 vs. $1,238)." ("Average Annual Workplace Family Health Premiums Rise Modest 3% to $18,142 in 2016; More Workers Enroll in High-Deductible Plans With Savings Option Over Past Two Years," The Kaiser Family Foundation , 9/14/16)

Since 2011, Small Businesses With Between 10-49 Employees Offering Health Insurance Has Decreased By 8 Percent. "Since 2011, the share of firms with 10 to 49 workers who offer coverage has fallen from 74 percent to 66 percent." ("Average Annual Workplace Family Health Premiums Rise Modest 3% to $18,142 in 2016; More Workers Enroll in High-Deductible Plans With Savings Option Over Past Two Years," The Kaiser Family Foundation , 9/14/16)


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