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President Trump’s Stand For American Industry

- June 19, 2018

Despite Their Rhetoric, Here's How Canada, China, And The European Union Have Engaged In A Variety Of Protectionist Policies Unfair To The U.S.


TOP TAKEAWAYS

  • Despite their commitments to free trade made as a condition of joining the World Trade Organization, U.S. trading partners Canada, China, and the European Union have protectionist policies which put the U.S. at a disadvantage.
    • Canada uses high tariffs and discriminatory trading practices to protect its dairy, poultry, and grain markets.
    • The European Union has instituted a variety of tariffs that hurt U.S. exporters wishing to enter, maintain, or expand their presence in European markets.
    • China has implemented trade policies that limit market access for imported goods, foreign manufacturers and foreign services.
  • On the whole, the United States consistently places smaller tariffs on imports across all sectors than Canada, China, and the European Union.
    • The United States' average applied tariff across all products is 3.4% while the European Union, Canada, and China average a tariff of 5.0%, 6.5%, and 9.9% respectively across all products.
    • The European Union, Canada, and China each average a far higher tariff (11.9%, 15.4%, 15.7 %,) across all agricultural products than the United States average agricultural product tariff (4.8).
  • The trade imbalance can also be seen in specific products and top exports; Canada, China, and the European Union all place a higher tariff on their top exports to the U.S. than the U.S. charges on the same products.
    • Canada places tariffs on imports of ice cream at 277% while the U.S. has a tariff of just 20%.
    • The European Union has a tariff of 7.7% on pasta while the U.S. has a tariff of 0%.
    • The average Chinese tariff on electrical machinery is 8.9% while the average U.S. tariff on electrical machinery is 1.7%
    • China has a tariff of 25% on automobiles while the U.S. has a tariff of just 2.5%
  • In the face of U.S.' trading partners unfair practices, President Trump is standing up and working to expand trade in a way that is freer and fairer for all.

KEY U.S. TRADING PARTNERS HAVE INSTITUTED A VARIETY OF UNFAIR TRADE BARRIERS TO THE DETRIMENT OF THE AMERICAN ECONOMY AND PEOPLE

As Members Of The World Trade Organization, China, The European Union, And Canada Committed To Lowering Trade Barriers Including Customs Duties Or Tariffs That Discriminate And Restrict Trade Between WTO Partners

Canada, China, And The European Union Are All Members Of The World Trade Organization. ("Members And Observers," World Trade Organization , Accessed 6/18/18)

As Members Of The WTO, Canada, China, And The European Union Committed To Lowering Trade Barriers Including Customs Duties And Tariffs That Restrict And Hamper The Flow Of Imports. "Lowering trade barriers is one of the most obvious ways of encouraging trade; these barriers include customs duties (or tariffs) and measures such as import bans or quotas that restrict quantities selectively." ("What We Stand For," World Trade Organization , Accessed 6/18/18)

These Nations Also Committed To Not Discriminate Between Trading Partners And Between Their Own And Foreign Products. "A country should not discriminate between its trading partners and it should not discriminate between its own and foreign products, services or nationals." ("What We Stand For," World Trade Organization , Accessed 6/18/18)

But, Canada Continually Uses Prohibitively High Tariffs And Discriminatory Regulatory Practices To Protect Its Dairy, Poultry, And Grain Markets

The U.S. Trade Representative's (USTR) 2018 Report Reported That U.S. Imports To Canada Above Quota Levels Are Subject To Prohibitively High Tariffs. "Canada's supply-management regime severely limits the ability of U.S. producers to increase exports to Canada above TRQ levels and inflates the prices Canadians pay for dairy and poultry products. Under the current system, U.S. imports above quota levels are subject to prohibitively high tariffs (e.g., 245 percent for cheese and 298 percent for butter). The United States remains concerned about potential Canadian actions that would further limit U.S. exports to the Canadian dairy market. The United States continues to monitor closely any tariff reclassifications of dairy products to ensure that U.S. market access is not negatively affected." ("2018 Trade Estimate Report On Foreign Trade Barriers," The United States Trade Representative , 03/18, p. 80)

In Particular, Canada Uses Supply-Management Systems To Regulate Its Dairy, Chicken, Turkey, And Egg Industries. "Canada uses supply-management systems to regulate its dairy, chicken, turkey, and egg industries. Canada's supply-management regime involves production quotas, producer-marketing boards to regulate price and supply, and tariff-rate quotas (TRQs) for imports." ("2018 Trade Estimate Report On Foreign Trade Barriers," The United States Trade Representative , 03/18, p. 80)

  • Supply Management Limits Imports Of Dairy And Poultry Products By Placing Tariffs On Imports Beyond A Certain Level Including Nearly 300% for Butter And Cream, And 240% For Cheese, Whole Milk And Yogurt. "The system basically limits production by allowing only a certain amount of each to be produced. The idea is to keep the market from getting saturated, which aims to keep prices stable and ensures steady incomes for farmers. The system also limits imports by slapping tariffs on imports beyond a certain level. For dairy products, those tariffs can be steep: nearly 300 per cent for butter and cream, and 240 per cent for cheese, whole milk and yogurt." (Sean Kilpatrick, "What Is Supply Management? Trump Attacks Renew Focus On Canada's Dairy System," Huffington Post , 6/11/18)

Additionally, Canada Has Raised Barriers To U.S. Grain Imports Which Have Encouraged A Discounting Of High Quality U.S. Grade And "De Facto Segregation" Of U.S. Grain At Canadian Elevators. "The barriers to assigning U.S. grain a premium grade encourages both a price discounting of high-quality U.S. grain appropriate for milling use and de facto segregation at Canadian elevators. The United States will continue to press the Canadian government to move forward swiftly with legislative and any other necessary changes that would enable grain grown outside Canada to receive a premium grade and changes to its varietal registration system." ("2018 Trade Estimate Report On Foreign Trade Barriers," The United States Trade Representative , 03/18, p. 81)

Due To European Union Policies, U.S. Exporters And Investors Face Persistent Barriers To Entering, Maintaining Or Expanding Their Presence In European Markets

U.S. Exporters Face A Proliferation Of Technical Barriers To Trade In The EU. "The United States faces a proliferation of technical barriers to trade in the EU. This is attributable in part to more recent regulatory development processes adopted by the EU, such as for what the EU calls implemented and delegated acts." ("2018 Trade Estimate Report On Foreign Trade Barriers," The United States Trade Representative , 03/18, p. 155)

The USTR Reported That U.S. Exporters And Investors Face Persistent Barriers To Entering, Maintain Or Expanding Their Presence In Certain Sectors Of The EU Market. "U.S. exporters and investors nonetheless face persistent barriers to entering, maintaining, or expanding their presence in certain sectors of the EU market." ("2018 Trade Estimate Report On Foreign Trade Barriers," The United States Trade Representative , 03/18, p. 155)

Despite Repeated Efforts To Resolve These Barriers Through Bilateral Consultations Or WTO Dispute Settlements, Some Of The Most Significant Barriers Have Endured Repeatedly. "Some of the most significant barriers, which have endured despite repeated efforts at resolution through bilateral consultations or WTO dispute settlement, have been highlighted in this report for many years." ("2018 Trade Estimate Report On Foreign Trade Barriers," The United States Trade Representative , 03/18, p. 155)

U.S. Exporters Looking To Trade With China Face Discriminatory And Unfair Trade Practices Designed To Protect China's Domestic Industries

­The USTR Has Found That China Has Implemented A Variety Of Industrial Policies That Seek To Limit Market Access For Imported Goods, Foreign Manufacturers And Foreign Services. "China continued to pursue a wide array of industrial policies in 2017 that seek to limit market access for imported goods, foreign manufacturers and foreign services suppliers, while offering substantial government guidance, resources and regulatory support to Chinese industries." ("2018 Trade Estimate Report On Foreign Trade Barriers," The United States Trade Representative , 03/18, p. 91)

China's Made In 2025 State Plan Aims To Replace Foreign Technology, Products, And Services With Chinese Technology, Products And Services In The China Market "So As To Ready Chinese Companies For Dominating International Market." "While ostensibly intended simply to raise industrial productivity through more advanced and flexible manufacturing techniques, Made in China 2025 is emblematic of China's evolving and increasingly sophisticated approach to 'indigenous innovation,' which is evident in numerous supporting and related industrial plans. Their common, overriding aim is to replace foreign technology, products and services with Chinese technology, products and services in the China market through any means possible so as to ready Chinese companies for dominating international markets." ("2018 Trade Estimate Report On Foreign Trade Barriers," The United States Trade Representative , 03/18, p. 91)

As Of 2017, China Was The "Least Transparent And Predictable" Of The World's Major Markets For Agricultural Products Due In Part To "Capricious Practices" And "Uneven Enforcement Of Regulations And Selective Intervention" By Chinese Authorities. "Notwithstanding this success, China remains among the least transparent and predictable of the world's major markets for agricultural products, largely because of uneven enforcement of regulations and selective intervention in the market by China's regulatory authorities. Seemingly capricious practices by Chinese customs and quarantine agencies delay or halt shipments of agricultural products into China. Sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) measures with questionable scientific bases or a generally opaque regulatory regime frequently have created difficulties and uncertainty for traders in agricultural commodities, who require as much certainty and transparency as possible." ("2017 National Trade Estimate Report On Foreign Trade Barriers," Office Of The United States Trade Representative , March 2017, pg. 91)

A CLOSE INSPECTION OF COUNTRY TARIFF PROFILES ILLUSTRATES THE OVERARCHING PROTECTIONIST POLICIES OF U.S. TRADING PARTNERS AROUND THE WORLD

The European Union, Canada, And China Each Average A Far Higher Tariff Across All Imported Products Than The United States

3.4% : The United States Average Applied Tariff Across All Products. ("World Tariff Profiles 2017," The World Trade Organization , Accessed 6/18/18, p. 177)

5.0% : The European Union's Average Applied Tariff Across All Products. ("World Tariff Profiles 2017," The World Trade Organization , Accessed 6/18/18, p.82)

6.5% : Canada's Average Applied Tariff Across All Products. ("World Tariff Profiles 2017," The World Trade Organization , Accessed 6/18/18, p. 62)

9.9% : China's Average Applied Tariff Across All Products. ("World Tariff Profiles 2017," The World Trade Organization , Accessed 6/18/18, p. 66)

The European Union, Canada, And China Impose A Far Higher Applied Tariff On Agricultural Products Than The United States

4.8% : The United States' Average Applied Tariff On Agricultural Products. ("World Tariff Profiles 2017," The World Trade Organization , Accessed 6/18/18, p. 177)

11.9% : The European Union's Average Applied Tariff On Agricultural Products. ("World Tariff Profiles 2017," The World Trade Organization , Accessed 6/18/18, p. 82)

15.4% : Canada's Average Applied Tariff On Agricultural Products. ("World Tariff Profiles 2017," The World Trade Organization , Accessed 6/18/18, p. 62)

15.7% : China's Average Applied Tariff On Agricultural Products. ("World Tariff Profiles 2017," The World Trade Organization , Accessed 6/18/18, p. 66)

The European Union, Canada, And China Impose Average Duties On Animal Products Ranging From 14% To 23% While The U.S. Places An Average Duty Of Just 2.2% On Animal Products

2.2% : The Average U.S. Tariff On Animal Products . ("World Tariff Profiles 2017," The World Trade Organization , Accessed 6/18/18, p. 177)

14.2% : The Average Chinese Tariff On Animal Products . ("World Tariff Profiles 2017," The World Trade Organization , Accessed 6/18/18, p. 66)

15.7% : The Average European Union Tariff On Animal Products . ("World Tariff Profiles 2017," The World Trade Organization , Accessed 6/18/18, p. 82)

23.5% : The Average Canadian Tariff On Animal Products. ("World Tariff Profiles 2017," The World Trade Organization , Accessed 6/18/18, p. 62)

The European Union And Canada Impose Average Duties On Dairy Products Of 35.4% And 248.9% Respectively While The U.S. Places An Average Duty On Imported Dairy Products Of Just 16.6%

16.6% : The Average U.S. Tariff On Dairy Products. ("World Tariff Profiles 2017," The World Trade Organization , Accessed 6/8/18, p. 177)

35.4% : The Average European Union Tariff On Dairy Products. ("World Tariff Profiles 2017," The World Trade Organization , Accessed 6/18/18, p. 82)

248.9% : The Average Canadian Tariff On Dairy Products. ("World Tariff Profiles 2017," The World Trade Organization , Accessed 6/18/18, p. 62)

The European Union And China Have An Average Duty Of 10.5% And 14.8% Respectively On Imported Fruits And Vegetables While The U.S. Has An Average Duty On Imported Fruits And Vegetables Of Just 4.7%

4.7% : The Average U.S. Tariff On Fruits And Vegetables. ("World Tariff Profiles 2017," The World Trade Organization , Accessed 6/18/18, p. 177)

10.5% : The Average European Union Tariff On Fruits And Vegetables. ("World Tariff Profiles 2017," The World Trade Organization , Accessed 6/18/18, p. 82)

14.8% : The Average Chinese Tariff On Fruits And Vegetables. ("World Tariff Profiles 2017," The World Trade Organization , Accessed 6/18/18, p. 62)

A LOOK AT KEY PRODUCTS AND TOP EXPORTS TO THE U.S. FROM CHINA, CANADA, AND THE EUROPEAN UNION SHOWS U.S. INDUSTRIES FACE HIGHER BARRIERS TO MARKET ENTRY THAN THEIR FOREIGN COUNTERPARTS

Despite Exporting $51 Billion Dollars Worth Of Vehicles To The U.S., Canada Maintains High Tariffs On Imports Of Vehicles

2.5% : The U.S. Tariff On Motor Vehicles. ("Harmonized Tariff Schedule Of The United States," United States International Trade Commission , 05/18, p. XVII 87-14)

VS.

6.1% : Canada's Tariff On 1000cc To 1,500cc Motor Vehicles . ("Departmental Consolidation Of The Customs Tariff 2018," Canada Border Services Agency , 2018, p. 87-5)

  • According To The USTR, Canada's Top Export Category To The U.S. In 2017 Was Vehicles ($51 Billion). The top export categories (2-digit HS) in 2017 were: vehicles ($51 billion), machinery ($42 billion), electrical machinery ($25 billion), mineral fuels ($19 billion), and plastics ($13 billion). ("Canada," Office Of The United States Trade Representative , Accessed 6/18/18)

Canada Places Exorbitantly Higher Tariffs On Ice Cream Imports Than The U.S.

20% : The United States' General Tariff On Ice Cream. ("Harmonized Tariff Schedule Of The United States," United States International Trade Commission , 05/18, p. IV 21-10)

VS.

277% : The Canadian After Quota Tariff On Ice Cream. ("Departmental Consolidation Of The Customs Tariff 2018," Canada Border Services Agency , 2018, p. 21-4)

Canada Places Exorbitantly Higher Tariffs On Cheese Than The U.S.

10% : The United States General Tariff On Cheese. ("Harmonized Tariff Schedule Of The United States," United States International Trade Commission , 05/18, p. I 4-36)

VS.

245% : Canada's After Quota Tariff On Cheese. ("Departmental Consolidation Of The Customs Tariff 2018," Canada Border Services Agency , 2018, p. 04-06)

Canada's Tariffs On Yogurt Imports Are Much Higher Than The U.S.

20% : The United States' General Tariff On Yogurt. ("Harmonized Tariff Schedule Of The United States," United States International Trade Commission , 05/18, p. I 4-36)

VS.

237.5%: Canada's After Quota Tariff On Yogurt. ("Departmental Consolidation Of The Customs Tariff 2018," Canada Border Services Agency , 2018, p. 04-3)

The European Union's Tariffs On Wine Range Much Higher Than U.S. Tariffs On Imported Wine

$0.05-$0.14 : The United States Has Tariffs Ranging From $0.05 To $0.14 For 750ml Bottles Of Wine. "By comparison, the U.S. import tariff on a 750 ml bottle is $0.05 for still wine and $0.14 for sparkling wine." ("Protective Tariffs," The Wine Institute , Accessed 6/18/18)

VS.

$0.11-$0.29 : The European Union Has Tariffs Ranging From $0.11 to $0.29 On 750ml Bottles Of Wine. "For example, the EU import tariff per 750 bottle can range from $0.11 to 0.29, depending on the type alcoholic content of the wine." ("Protective Tariffs," The Wine Institute , Accessed 6/18/18)

The European Union's Tariffs On Pasta Are Much Higher Than The U.S.' Tariffs On Pasta

0% : U.S. Tariffs On Pasta. ("Harmonized Tariff Schedule Of The United States," United States International Trade Commission , 05/18, p. IV 19-20)

VS.

7.7% : European Union General Tariff On Pasta. ("Tariff Line Duties," World Trade Organization , Accessed 6/17/18)

Despite Exporting $15 Billion Dollars Worth Of Aircraft To The U.S., China Maintains A Tariff Of 5% On Most Aircraft Imports

0% : U.S. Duty On Aircraft Exceeding 15,000kg. ("Tariff Line Duties," World Trade Organization , Accessed 6/17/18)

5% : Chinese Duty On Aircraft Exceeding 15,000kg. ("Tariff Line Duties," World Trade Organization , Accessed 6/17/18)

  • China's Top Export Category To The U.S. In 2016 Was Aircraft. "The top export categories (2-digit HS) in 2016 were: miscellaneous grain, seeds, fruit (i.e., soybeans) ($15 billion), aircraft ($15 billion), electrical machinery ($12 billion), machinery ($11 billion) and vehicles ($11 billion)." ("China," The United States Trade Representative , Accessed 6/18/18)

Despite Exporting $12 Billion In Electrical Machinery To The U.S., China Maintains An Average Tariff Of 8.9% On Electrical Machinery Imports

1.7% : The Average U.S. Tariff On Electrical Machinery. ("World Tariff Profiles 2017," The World Trade Organization , Accessed 6/18/18, p. 177)

8.9% : The Average Chinese Tariff On Electrical Machinery.

  • China's Second Highest Export Category In 2016 To The U.S. Was Electrical Machinery ($12 Billion). "The top export categories (2-digit HS) in 2016 were: miscellaneous grain, seeds, fruit (i.e., soybeans) ($15 billion), aircraft ($15 billion), electrical machinery ($12 billion), machinery ($11 billion) and vehicles ($11 billion)." ("China," The United States Trade Representative , Accessed 6/18/18)

China's Tariffs On Coffee Imports Are Much Higher Than The United States' Tariffs On Coffee

0% : The U.S. Current Tariff On Coffee. ("Harmonized Tariff Schedule Of The United States," United States International Trade Commission , 05/18, p. II 9-2)

14.3% : China's Current Tariff On Coffee . ("Tariff Line Duties," World Trade Organization , Accessed 6/17/18)

China's Tariffs On Ketchup Are Much Higher Than U.S. Tariffs On Ketchup

6% : The U.S. Tariff On Ketchup. ("Harmonized Tariff Schedule Of The United States," United States International Trade Commission , 05/18, p. IV 21-8)

VS.

15%: China's Tariff On Tomato Ketchup. ("Tariff Line Duties," World Trade Organization , Accessed 6/17/18)

China's Tariffs On Automobiles Are Much Higher Than U.S. Tariffs On Automobiles

2.5% : The U.S. Tariff On Automobiles. ("Harmonized Tariff Schedule Of The United States," United States International Trade Commission , 05/18, p. XVII 87-14)

VS.

25% : The Average Chinese Tariff On Automobiles. ("Tariff Line Duties," World Trade Organization , Accessed 6/17/18)

  • One Of China's Highest Export Categories To The U.S. In 2016 Was Motor Vehicles ($11 Billion). "The top export categories (2-digit HS) in 2016 were: miscellaneous grain, seeds, fruit (i.e., soybeans) ($15 billion), aircraft ($15 billion), electrical machinery ($12 billion), machinery ($11 billion) and vehicles ($11 billion)." ("China," The United States Trade Representative , Accessed 6/18/18)

PRESIDENT TRUMP IS STANDING UP TO THESE UNFAIR TRADING PRACTICES

Upon Entering Office, President Trump Promised To Stand Up For American Workers And American Exports And Ensure The U.S. Expanded Trade In A Way That Was Freer And Fairer For All

In 2017, President Trump Released His Trade Agenda Stating That The Overarching Purpose Of The United States Trade Policy Was To Expand Trade In A Way That Was ­­Freer And Fairer For All Americans. "The overarching purpose of our trade policy - the guiding principle behind all of our actions in this key area - will be to expand trade in a way that is freer and fairer for all Americans." ("The President's 2017 Trade Policy Agenda," The United States Trade Representative , p. 1)

The President Promised To Ensure U.S. Workers And Businesses Had A Fair Opportunity To Compete In Key Markets Around The World. ""In addition to these basic principles, we will focus on the following key objectives: Ensuring that U.S. workers and businesses have a fair opportunity to compete for business - both in the domestic U.S. market and in other key markets around the world." ("The President's 2017 Trade Policy Agenda," The United States Trade Representative , p. 1)

In Particular, The President Rejected The Notion That The United States Turn A Blind Eye To Unfair Trade Practices That Have Disadvantaged American Workers, Farmers, Ranchers, And Businesses In Global Markets. "Finally, we reject the notion that the United States should, for putative geopolitical advantage, turn a blind eye to unfair trade practices that disadvantage American workers, farmers, ranchers, and businesses in global markets." ("The President's 2017 Trade Policy Agenda," The United States Trade Representative , p. 1)

The President Promised U.S. Trade Policy Would Be Geared To Breaking Down Unfair Trade Barriers That Blocked U.S. Exports. Breaking down unfair trade barriers in other markets that block U.S. exports, including exports of agricultural goods." ("The President's 2017 Trade Policy Agenda," The United States Trade Representative , p. 1)

President Trump Has Imposed Tariffs On Washing Machines And Solar Panels

In January 2018, The U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) Robert Lighthizer Announced Tariffs On Imported Residential Washing Machines And Imported Solar Cells And Modules. "U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer announced today that President Trump has approved recommendations to impose safeguard tariffs on imported large residential washing machines and imported solar cells and modules." (Press Release, "President Trump Approves Relief For U.S. Washing Machine And Solar Cell Manufacturers," Office Of The United States Trade Representative , 1/18)

The USTR Determined Foreign Imports Of Washers And Solar Cell Modules Were A Substantial Cause Of Injury To Domestic Manufacturers. "USTR made the recommendations to the President based on consultations with the interagency Trade Policy Committee (TPC) in response to findings by the independent, bipartisan U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) that increased foreign imports of washers and solar cells and modules are a substantial cause of serious injury to domestic manufacturers." (Press Release, "President Trump Approves Relief For U.S. Washing Machine And Solar Cell Manufacturers," Office Of The United States Trade Representative , 1/ 18)

USTR: "The President's Action [Made] Clear Again That The Trump Administration Will Always Defend American Workers, Farmers, Ranchers, And Businesses In This Regard." "Based on this information, the Trade Policy Committee developed recommendations, which the President has accepted. The President's action makes clear again that the Trump Administration will always defend American workers, farmers, ranchers, and businesses in this regard." (Press Release, "President Trump Approves Relief For U.S. Washing Machine And Solar Cell Manufacturers," Office Of The United States Trade Representative , 1/ 18)

President Trump Launched The Renegotiation Of The North American Free Trade Agreement

President Trump's Administration Has Issued A Broad Plan For Renegotiating The North American Free Trade Agreement. "The Trump administration on Monday unveiled its goals for renegotiating the North American Free Trade Agreement, issuing a broad plan for how it hopes to rewrite the terms of trade and transform the U.S. economy for decades to come. The document contained a broad list of objectives, including some goals that have been specifically championed by President Trump, as well as numerous provisions that echo the Trans Pacific Partnership, an Obama-era trade agreement that Trump has disparaged." (Ana Swanson, "Trump Administration Unveils Goals In Renegotiating NAFTA, The Washington Post , 07/17/17)

The Presidents Objectives For NAFTA Include Improving The U.S. Trade Balance And Reduce The Trade Deficit With NAFTA Countries. ("Summery Of Objectives For The NAFTA Renegotiation," Office Of The United States Trade Representative , 7/17/17)

The President Also Seeks To Address Non-Tariff Barriers That Constrain U.S. Exports To NAFTA Countries. "Maintain existing reciprocal duty-free market access for industrial goods and strengthen disciplines to address non-tariff barriers that constrain U.S. exports to NAFTA countries." ("Summery Of Objectives For The NAFTA Renegotiation," Office Of The United States Trade Representative , 7/17/17, Pg. 4)

President Trump Has Instituted Blanket Tariffs Of 25% And 10% On Steel And Aluminum Imports Respectively

On March 1, 2018, President Trump Announced He Would Be Instituting Tariffs On Aluminum And Steel Imports. PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: "So we're bringing it back, and we're going to bring it back relatively rapidly, and we're going to be instituting tariffs. Next week, we'll be signing - perhaps some of you folks will be here. When you have Nucor, when you have U.S. Steel, you have the great aluminum companies represented at this table. And they've been decimated. Aluminum has been decimated in the country." (President Trump, Remarks By President Trump In Listening Session With Representatives From The Steel And Aluminum Industry , Washington, DC, 3/01/18)

The President Announced He Would Be Instituting A 25% Tariff On Steel And A 10% Tariff On Aluminum Products. TRUMP: "Unlimited period. Unlimited." QUESTION: "Twenty-five on steel?" TRUMP: "Twenty-five percent for steel. It will be 10 percent for aluminum. And it will be for a long period of time." (President Trump, Remarks By President Trump In Listening Session With Representatives From The Steel And Aluminum Industry , Washington, DC, 3/01/18)

President Trump Imposed $50 Billion Dollars Worth Of Tariffs On China For Its Intellectual Property Theft

China Has Been "Doing Its Utmost To Promote Exports -- And To Block Trading Partners, Particularly Major Industrial Powers Like The U.S., From Getting Much Of A Foothold In Its Fast-Growing Domestic Markets." "China became the world's second-largest economy ($11.4 trillion), behind the U.S. ($18.5 trillion), mostly by doing its utmost to promote exports -- and to block trading partners, particularly major industrial powers like the U.S., from getting much of a foothold in its fast-growing domestic markets." (Larry Light, "Is China The Unfair Trade Villain Trump Says It Is?," CBS , 4/6/17)

In Mid-August 2017, President Trump Ordered An Investigation Into The Chinese Government's Role In The Unfair Transfer Of U.S. Intellectual Property To Private Chinese Companies. "In mid-August, the U.S. launched a section 301 investigation into China's public support for its private companies through the unfair transfer of IP. A positive finding in this investigation could result in the unilateral imposition of tariffs and quotas on Chinese goods in a broad array of industries. Administration officials, such as Pete Navarro and Wilbur Ross, have been advocating for such protectionist measures. Moreover, the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) Robert Lighthizer has publicly stated his support for ignoring WTO dispute resolution mechanisms in favor of unilateral tools." (Edward Barss, "Trump's Intellectual Property Push And The Hope For Chinese Reform," The Diplomat , 11/12/17)

  • Section 301 Of The Trade Act Of 1974 Allows The United States To Impose Trade Sanctions On Foreign Countries That Violate Trade Agreements Or Engage In Other Unfair Trade Practices. "Section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974 provides the United States with the authority to enforce trade agreements, resolve trade disputes, and open foreign markets to U.S. goods and services. It is the principal statutory authority under which the United States may impose trade sanctions on foreign countries that either violate trade agreements or engage in other unfair trade practices. When negotiations to remove the offending trade practice fail, the United States may take action to raise import duties on the foreign country's products as a means to rebalance lost concessions." ("Section 301," International Trade Administration , Accessed 03/22/18)

On March 21, 2018, The White House Announced President Trump Would Be Taking Action Based On The USTR's 301 Investigation Into Chinese Intellectual Property Theft. "The White House plans to announce a package of tariffs Thursday penalizing China for intellectual property theft. 'Tomorrow the President will announce the actions he has decided to take based on USTR's 301 investigation into China's state-led, market-distorting efforts to force, pressure, and steal U.S. technologies and intellectual property,' principal deputy press secretary Raj Shah said in a statement Wednesday." (Kayla Tausche, and Jacob Pramuk, "White House Will Announce Tariffs Cracking Down On Chinese Theft Of Intellectual Property," CNBC , 03/21/18)

The Trump Administration Imposed New Tariffs Against China Estimated To Be Around Be Around $50 Billion Per Year. "President Trump plans to unveil his aggressive package of tariffs against China tomorrow, with a charge led by U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer that will use Section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974 to target Beijing. Two sources with direct knowledge tell me Kevin Hassett has been crunching the numbers, and the dollar value of the tariffs will likely be around $50 billion per year - or slightly less. The administration has used an algorithm to select a batch of Chinese products and then apply tariff rates to those products in a way that will hopefully limit the harm to American consumers." (Jonathan Swan, "Scoop: Trump To Announe Anti-China Tariffs Tomorrow," Axios , 3/21/18)

On June 18, 2018, President Trump Directed The USTR To Identify An Additional $200 Billion Dollars Worth Of Chinese Goods To Be Tariffed At 10%

In A Press Release, President Trump Reported That He Had Directed The USTR To Identify $200 Billion Dollars' Worth Of Chinese Goods For Additional Tariffs At A Rate Of 10%. "Therefore, today, I directed the United States Trade Representative to identify $200 billion worth of Chinese goods for additional tariffs at a rate of 10 percent. After the legal process is complete, these tariffs will go into effect if China refuses to change its practices, and also if it insists on going forward with the new tariffs that it has recently announced. If China increases its tariffs yet again, we will meet that action by pursuing additional tariffs on another $200 billion of goods. The trade relationship between the United States and China must be much more equitable." (Press Release, "Statement From The President Regarding Trade With China," The White House , 6/19/18)

President Trump's Order Came In Response To China's Move To Raise Tariffs On $50 Billion Dollars' Worth Of U.S. Exports. "However and unfortunately, China has determined that it will raise tariffs on $50 billion worth of United States exports. China apparently has no intention of changing its unfair practices related to the acquisition of American intellectual property and technology. Rather than altering those practices, it is now threatening United States companies, workers, and farmers who have done nothing wrong." (Press Release, "Statement From The President Regarding Trade With China," The White House , 6/19/18)

The President Warned That If China Increased Its Tariffs Again, The U.S. Would Meet That Action By Pursuing Additional Tariffs On Another $200 Billion Dollars' Worth Of Chinese Exports. "If China increases its tariffs yet again, we will meet that action by pursuing additional tariffs on another $200 billion of goods. The trade relationship between the United States and China must be much more equitable." (Press Release, "Statement From The President Regarding Trade With China," The White House , 6/19/18)


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By providing your phone number, you are consenting to receive calls and SMS/MMS msgs, including autodialed and automated calls and texts, to that number from the Republican National Committee. Msg&data rates may apply. Terms & conditions/privacy policy apply 80810-info.com.

Paid for by the Republican National Committee.
Not Authorized By Any Candidate Or Candidate's Committee. www.gop.com