Contribute
CONNECT:

research

Sanders Berns The Clinton Foundation

- June 5, 2016

Today On CNN, Sanders Took Aim At The Clinton Foundation's Foreign Government Donations. CNN's JAKE TAPPER: "You have not been critical of the Clinton Foundation, but there are those who say that there is something inherently wrong with an American charity, especially one with ties to a Secretary of State, taking money from the Saudis, and other foreign governments that don't represent our values. Is that a fair criticism?" SEN. BERNIE SANDERS (D-VT): "Yes, it is. If you ask me about the Clinton Foundation, do I have a problem, when a sitting Secretary of State and a Foundation ran by her husband collects many millions of dollars from foreign governments, governments which are dictatorships, you don't have a lot of civil liberties, or democratic rights in Saudi Arabia, you don't have a lot of respect there for opposition points, for gay rights, for women's rights, um yeah, do I have a problem with that? Yeah I do." TAPPER: "You think it creates an appearance of conflict of interest?" SANDERS: "Yeah, I do." (CNN's "State Of The Union," 6/5/16)

Click To Watch

Clinton's Own State Department Classified The FOllowing COuntries AS Having Poor HUman RIghts Records, All Of Which Gave Money To The Foundation

Algeria

As Of 2016, The Embassy Of Algeria Has Donated Between $250,001 And $500,000 To The Clinton Foundation. (Clinton Foundation, Accessed 3/15/16)

2012

According To The 2012 U.S. State Department Report On Human Rights Practices For Algeria, Women Faced Violence And Discrimination. "Women faced violence and discrimination, and the government maintained restrictions on workers' rights." ("Country Reports On Human Rights Practices For 2012: Algeria," U.S. State Department, 4/19/13)

The Most Significant Human Rights Problems Were Restrictions On The Freedom Of Assembly, Lack Of Judicial Independence And "Overuse Of Pretrial Detention." "The three most significant continuing human rights problems were restrictions on freedom of assembly and association, lack of judicial independence, and reported overuse of pretrial detention." ("Country Reports On Human Rights Practices For 2012: Algeria," U.S. State Department, 4/19/13)

Other Human Rights Concerns Included Use Of Excessive Force By Police, Poor Prison Conditions And Widespread Corruption. "Other human rights concerns were limitations on the ability of citizens to change their government, excessive use of force by police, and poor prison conditions. Additionally, widespread corruption accompanied reports of limited government transparency." ("Country Reports On Human Rights Practices For 2012: Algeria," U.S. State Department, 4/19/13)

Impunity For Police And Security Officials And Abuses By Illegal Paramilitary Forces Were Also A Problem. "Impunity remained a problem. The government did not publicly provide information on actions taken against police and security service officials. Abuses by illegal paramilitary forces remained a significant problem." ("Country Reports On Human Rights Practices For 2012: Algeria," U.S. State Department, 4/19/13)

2011

According To The 2011 U.S. State Department Report On Human Rights Practices For Algeria, Women Faced Violence And Discrimination. "Women faced violence and discrimination, and the government maintained restrictions on workers' rights." ("2011 Human Rights Report: Algeria," U.S. State Department, 5/24/12)

The Most Significant Human Rights Violations Were Restrictions On Freedom Of Assembly, Restrictions On The Ability To Change The Government, And A "Failure To Account For Disappearances." "The three most significant continuing human rights problems were restrictions on freedom of assembly and association; the inability of citizens to change their government, notably in light of the 2008 constitutional revisions that allow the president to run for unlimited terms of office; and the failure to account for disappearances, especially those cases from the 1990s. On February 9, the government repealed the state of emergency, in force for 19 years, and subsequently adopted two ordinances that replaced provisions related to the state of emergency that allow the army to intervene in terrorist offenses and subversive acts." ("2011 Human Rights Report: Algeria," U.S. State Department, 5/24/12)

The State Department Also Reported Extrajudicial Killings, Abuse Of Prisoners And Widespread Corruption Among Other Human Rights Concerns. "Other human rights concerns were reports of unlawful killings, overuse of pretrial detention, poor prison conditions, abuse of prisoners, and lack of judicial independence. Additionally, widespread corruption accompanied reports of limited government transparency. Authorities used security grounds to constrain freedom of expression and movement." ("2011 Human Rights Report: Algeria," U.S. State Department, 5/24/12)

2010

According To The 2010 U.S. State Department Report On Human Rights Practices For Algeria, Women Faced Violence And Discrimination. "Women faced violence and discrimination, and the government maintained restrictions on workers' rights." ("2010 Human Rights Report: Algeria," U.S. State Department, 4/8/11)

The Main Human Rights Problem Was The Restriction Of Civil Liberties. "Principal human rights problems included restrictions on freedom of assembly and association, which significantly impaired political party activities and limited citizens' ability to change the government peacefully through elections." ("2010 Human Rights Report: Algeria," U.S. State Department, 4/8/11)

The State Department Reported Arbitrary Killings, Official Impunity And Widespread Corruption. "There were reports of arbitrary killings. Failures to account for persons who disappeared in the 1990s and to address the demands of victims' families remained problematic. There were reports of official impunity, overuse of pretrial detention, poor prison conditions, abuse of prisoners, and lack of judicial independence. Additionally, widespread corruption accompanied reports of limited government transparency. Authorities used security grounds to constrain freedom of expression and movement." ("2010 Human Rights Report: Algeria," U.S. State Department, 4/8/11)

2009

According To The 2009 U.S. State Department Report On Human Rights Practices For Algeria, Women Faced Violence And Discrimination. "Additionally, there were limitations on religious freedom, problems with security-based restrictions on movement, corruption and lack of government transparency, discrimination and violence against women, and restrictions on workers' rights." ("2009 Human Rights Report: Algeria," U.S. State Department, 3/11/10)

The State Department Reported Restrictions On Civil Liberties, Torture And The Inability Of Citizens To Change Their Government As Human Rights Problems In 2009. "Restrictions on freedom of assembly and association significantly impaired political party activities and significantly limited citizens' ability to change the government peacefully through elections. Failure to account for persons who disappeared in the 1990s and address the demands of some advocacy groups for families of victims remained significant problems. Reports of abuse and torture occurred but were fewer than in previous years. There were also reports of official impunity, abuse of pretrial detention, poor prison conditions, limited judicial independence, and restrictions on freedom of speech, press, and assembly. Additionally, there were limitations on religious freedom, problems with security-based restrictions on movement, corruption and lack of government transparency, discrimination and violence against women, and restrictions on workers' rights." ("2009 Human Rights Report: Algeria," U.S. State Department, 3/11/10)

Brunei

As Of 2016, The Government Of Brunei Darussalam Has Donated Between $1,000,001 And $5,000,000 To The Clinton Foundation. (Clinton Foundation, Accessed 3/15/16)

2014

On June 27, 2014, Human Rights And Labor Activists In 13 Cities Around The World, Including In Los Angeles, CA, Held An "International Day Of Action" Pressing The Sultan Of Brunei To Repeal Laws That Discriminated Against Gays And Women. "Human rights and labor activists in 13 cities on four continents will hold an 'international day of action' on June 27 to press for the Sultan of Brunei to repeal laws that discriminate against gays and women. The protests, which are being organized by LGBT groups and international labor unions, are planned in every country where the Sultan's Dorchester Collection owns hotels: in London, at the Dorchester and 45 Park; in Geneva at Le Richemond; in Milan at the Hotel Principe de Savoia; in Rome at the Hotel Eden; in Paris at Le Meurice and in Beverly Hills at the Will Rogers Memorial park across the street from the Beverly Hills Hotel." (Tina Daunt, "Activists Set Worldwide Day of Protest Against Sultan of Brunei," The Hollywood Reporter, 6/24/14)

  • In 2014, The Sultan Of Brunei Legalized The Stoning To Death Of Same-Sex Couples And Raping Wives If They Are Over The Age Of 13. "The Sultan of Brunei legalized harsh punishments for same-sex couples looking to marry, including stoning to death. New laws in Brunei also make is legal to rape a wife if she is over the age of 13." ("Stars Step Up Protest Against Anti-Gay Owner Of Beverly Hills Hotel," CBS News, 2/6/15)

National Security Advisor Susan Rice Singled Out Brunei As One Of The World's Worst Transgressors Against Gay Rights. "On Tuesday, President Barack Obama's national security advisor singled out Brunei as one of the world's worst transgressors against gay rights. 'Unfortunately, in too many places, being gay or transgender is enough to make someone the target of slurs, torments, and violence,' Susan Rice told a gathering of LGBT activists at the White House. "We all know the names of Harvey Milk, Eric Lembembe, David Kato, and too many other brave advocates who refused to hide or be silenced, and who have been ostracized or killed for their work. 'In many places, allies and supporters of the LGBT community are also penalized,' Rice continued. 'New laws in Uganda and Nigeria incite the fear of arrest and detention for those who provide health services or defend basic legal rights in court. In addition to the pernicious so-called 'propaganda/ law already on the books, proposed legislation in Russia would allow the government to take children away from their gay parents. There are almost 80 countries - eight-zero - countries in this world where discrimination against LGBT citizens is enshrined in law, and that number threatens to grow. In seven countries - eight, if Brunei continues on its path - same-sex acts are punishable by death.'" (Tina Daunt, "Activists Set Worldwide Day of Protest Against Sultan of Brunei," The Hollywood Reporter, 6/24/14)

2012

Discrimination Against Women And Human Trafficking Were Reported In Brunei. "The following human rights problems were also reported: inability of citizens to change their government, trafficking in persons, and discrimination against women." ("Country Reports On Human Rights Practices For 2012: Brunei," U.S. State Department, 4/19/13)

According To The 2012 U.S. State Department Report On Human Rights Practices For Brunei, The Most Prevalent Human Rights Problems Included Restrictions On Religious Freedom, Freedom Of Speech, Press And Assembly. "Restrictions on religious freedom; exploitation of foreign workers; and limitations on freedom of speech, press, assembly, and association were the most prevalent human rights problems." ("Country Reports On Human Rights Practices For 2012: Brunei," U.S. State Department, 4/19/13)

2011

According To The 2011 U.S. State Department Report On Human Rights Practices For Brunei, Discrimination Against Women Was Reported. "The following human rights problems were also reported: inability of citizens to change their government, trafficking in persons, and discrimination against women." ("2011 Human Rights Report: Brunei," U.S. State Department, 5/24/12)

The Principal Human Rights Problems Included The Restriction Of Freedom Of Religion, Speech And Assembly. "Restrictions on religious freedom; exploitation of foreign workers; and limitations on freedom of speech, press, assembly, and association were the most prevalent human rights problems." ("2011 Human Rights Report: Brunei," U.S. State Department, 5/24/12)

2010

According To The 2010 U.S. State Department Report On Human Rights Practices For Brunei, Discrimination Against Women, Restriction Of Civil Liberties And Human Trafficking Were Reported In 2010. "The following human rights problems were reported: inability of citizens to change their government; limits on freedom of speech, press, assembly, and association; restrictions on religious freedom; discrimination against women; trafficking in persons; restricted labor rights; and exploitation of foreign workers." ("2010 Human Rights Report: Brunei Darussalam," U.S. State Department, 4/8/11)

2009

According To The 2009 U.S. State Department Report On Human Rights Practices For Brunei, Discrimination Against Women, Restrictions On Civil Liberties, Arbitrary Detention And The Inability Of Citizens To Change Their Government Were The Human Rights Problems Reported In 2009. "The following human rights problems were reported: inability of citizens to change their government; arbitrary detention; limits on freedom of speech, press, assembly, and association; restrictions on religious freedom; discrimination against women; restricted labor rights; and exploitation of foreign workers." ("2009 Human Rights Report: Brunei Darussalam," U.S. State Department, 3/11/10)

Kuwait

As Of 2016, The State Of Kuwait Has Donated Between $5,000,001 And $10,000,000 To The Clinton Foundation. (Clinton Foundation, Accessed 3/15/16)

2012

According To The 2012 U.S. State Department Report On Human Rights Practices For Kuwait, Human Rights Problems In Kuwait Included Limitations Of Freedom Of Speech And Assembly, And Human Trafficking. "Principal human rights problems included limitations on citizens' right to change their government; restrictions on freedom of speech and assembly, especially among foreign workers and stateless Arabs (called 'Bidoon'); trafficking in persons within the foreign worker population, especially in the domestic and unskilled service sectors; and limitations on workers' rights." ("Country Reports On Human Rights Practices For 2012: Kuwait," U.S. State Department, 4/19/13)

Freedom Of The Press Was Restricted And Women "Faced Social And Legal Discrimination." "Other human rights problems included reports of security force members abusing prisoners; restrictions on freedom of movement for certain groups, including foreign workers and Bidoon; and limitations on freedoms of press, association, and religion. Women and Bidoon faced social and legal discrimination." ("Country Reports On Human Rights Practices For 2012: Kuwait," U.S. State Department, 4/19/13)

2011

According To The 2011 U.S. State Department Report On Human Rights Practices For Kuwait, Women Were Not Given Equal Rights. "Bidoon faced social and legal discrimination, and women did not enjoy equal rights." ("2011 Human Rights Report: Kuwait," U.S. State Department, 5/24/12)

The Principal Human Rights Problems Included Restrictions On Freedom Of Speech And Assembly, Human Trafficking In Foreign Workers And The Inability Of Citizens To Change Their Governments. "Principal human rights problems included limitations on citizens' right to change their government; trafficking in persons within the expatriate worker population, especially in the domestic and unskilled service sectors; and limitations on workers' rights. Authorities restricted freedom of speech and assembly, especially among foreign workers and stateless Arabs (called 'Bidoon')." ("2011 Human Rights Report: Kuwait," U.S. State Department, 5/24/12)

Other Human Rights Problems Included Abuse Of Prisoners And Restrictions On Freedom Of Press, Religion And Association. "Other human rights problems included reports of security forces abusing prisoners; restrictions on freedom of movement for certain groups, including foreign workers and Bidoon; and limitations on freedoms of press, association, and religion at times during the year." ("2011 Human Rights Report: Kuwait," U.S. State Department, 5/24/12)

2010

According To The 2010 U.S. State Department Report On Human Rights Practices For Kuwait, Women Were Not Given Equal Rights. "Women did not enjoy equal rights. Worker rights were limited, and expatriate workers were subject to severe limitations of rights and discrimination as well, especially in the domestic and unskilled service sectors." ("2010 Human Rights Report: Kuwait," U.S. State Department, 4/8/11)

The Human Rights Problems Included Restrictions Of Civil Liberties, Abuse Of Prisoners And Human Trafficking. "Principal human rights problems included limitations on citizens' right to change their government. There were reports of security forces abusing prisoners. Authorities limited freedoms of speech, press, assembly, association, and religion. The government limited freedom of movement for certain groups, including foreign workers and stateless Arab residents (called 'Bidoon'). The status of the Bidoon remained unresolved and they faced social and legal discrimination. Trafficking in persons remained a problem. Women did not enjoy equal rights. Worker rights were limited, and expatriate workers were subject to severe limitations of rights and discrimination as well, especially in the domestic and unskilled service sectors." ("2010 Human Rights Report: Kuwait," U.S. State Department, 4/8/11)

2009

According To The 2009 U.S. State Department Report On Human Rights Practices For Kuwait, Although Some Progress Was Made, Women Were Not Given Equal Rights. "Women did not enjoy equal rights, although some advances were made. Expatriate workers faced difficult conditions in the domestic and unskilled service sectors." ("2009 Human Rights Report: Kuwait," U.S. State Department, 3/11/10)

Other Human Rights Concerns Included The Restriction Of Civil Liberties, Corruption And Human Trafficking. "The government limited citizens' right to change their government and form political parties. There were a few reports of security forces abusing prisoners and at least one investigation and prosecution related to prisoner abuse. The government limited freedoms of speech, religion, and movement for certain groups and, although widely regarded as allowing considerably free media, occasionally limited media freedom. The status of stateless Arab residents (called 'Bidoon') remained unresolved. Government corruption and trafficking in persons remained problems. Women did not enjoy equal rights, although some advances were made. Expatriate workers faced difficult conditions in the domestic and unskilled service sectors." ("2009 Human Rights Report: Kuwait," U.S. State Department, 3/11/10)

Oman

As Of 2016, The Sultanate Of Oman Has Donated Between $1,000,001 And $5,000,000 To The Clinton Foundation, Making A New Donation In 2014. (Clinton Foundation, Accessed 3/16/16)

2012

According To The 2012 U.S. State Department Report On Human Rights Practices For Oman, Human Rights Violations Reported Included Political And Economic Discrimination Of Women, And Restriction Of Freedom Of Speech And Assembly. "The principal human rights problems were the inability of citizens to change their government, limits on freedom of speech and assembly, and discrimination against women, including political and economic exclusion based on cultural norms. Thirty-two individuals were convicted on charges of libel against the sultan during the year, receiving prison sentences from six to 18 months and fines of 500 to 1,000 Omani rials (approximately $1,300 to $2,600). Another 12 individuals were convicted on charges of illegal assembly (assembly without a permit) while peacefully protesting some of the libel convictions. The protesters each received a prison sentence of one year and a 1,000 rial fine (approximately $2,600)." ("Country Reports On Human Rights Practices For 2012: Oman," U.S. State Department, 4/19/13)

Oman Also Experienced Restriction Of The Freedom Of Press, Forced Labor And Abuse Of Foreign Citizen Workers. "Other ongoing concerns included lack of independent inspections of prisons and detention centers, restrictions on press freedom, instances of domestic violence, and instances of foreign citizen laborers placed in conditions of forced labor or abuse." ("Country Reports On Human Rights Practices For 2012: Oman," U.S. State Department, 4/19/13)

2011

According To The 2011 U.S. State Department Report On Human Rights Practices For Oman, The Principal Human Rights Concerns In 2011 Were Discrimination Against Women, Limitation Of Freedom Of Speech And An Inability To Change The Government. "The principal human rights problems were the inability of citizens to change their government, limits on freedom of speech, and societal mores that discriminate against women." ("2011 Human Rights Report: Oman," U.S. State Department, 5/24/12)

Other Human Rights Concerns Included Restriction Of The Freedom Of Press And Assembly, Domestic Violence And Forced Labor For Expatriate Workers. "Other ongoing human rights concerns included restrictions on freedoms of press and association, instances of domestic violence, isolated reports that some employers placed expatriate laborers in conditions of forced labor or abuse, and lack of independent inspections of prisons and detention centers." ("2011 Human Rights Report: Oman," U.S. State Department, 5/24/12)

2010

According To The 2010 U.S. State Department Report On Human Rights Practices For Oman, Women Faced Violence And Societal Discrimination. "Women faced societal discrimination, and instances of domestic violence were reported. There were also isolated reports that some employers placed expatriate laborers in situations indicative of forced labor or abuse." ("2010 Human Rights Report: Oman," U.S. State Department, 4/8/11)

The Government Of Oman Generally Respected Human Rights But There Were Some Restrictions On Civil Liberties. "Citizens did not have the right to change their government; however, operating under the 1996 Basic Law, the government generally respected the human rights of its citizens. The law and judiciary, including the establishment of a quasi-independent human rights commission, provided means of addressing individual instances of abuse. Principal human rights problems included the lack of consistent independent nongovernmental inspections of prisons and detention centers. Some restrictions on privacy and freedoms of speech, press, assembly, association, and religion remained, yet they were not universally applied." ("2010 Human Rights Report: Oman," U.S. State Department, 4/8/11)

2009

According To The 2009 U.S. State Department Report On Human Rights Practices For Oman, Women Faced Violence And Discrimination. "Instances of discrimination and domestic violence toward women were reported. There were also isolated reports some employers placed expatriate laborers in situations indicative of forced labor or abuse." ("2009 Human Rights Report: Oman," U.S. State Department, 3/11/10)

Although The Government Of Oman Generally Respected Human Rights, There Were Some Restrictions On Civil Liberties Such As Freedom Of Press, Speech And Religion. "Citizens did not have the right to change their government; however, operating under a system of rule of law based on the Basic Law of 1996, the government generally respected the human rights of its citizens. The government placed some restrictions on privacy and freedoms of speech, press, assembly, association, and religion. Instances of discrimination and domestic violence toward women were reported. There were also isolated reports some employers placed expatriate laborers in situations indicative of forced labor or abuse." ("2009 Human Rights Report: Oman," U.S. State Department, 3/11/10)

Qatar

As Of 2016, The State Of Qatar Has Donated Between $1,000,001 And $5,000,000 To The Clinton Foundation. (Clinton Foundation, Accessed 3/15/16)

2012

According To The 2012 U.S. State Department Report On Human Rights Practices For Qatar, Legal, Institutional, And Cultural Discrimination Limited Women's Participation In Society. "Legal, institutional, and cultural discrimination against women limited their participation in society. The noncitizen 'Bidoon' (stateless persons) who resided in the country with an unresolved legal status experienced social discrimination." ("Country Reports On Human Rights Practices For 2012: Qatar," U.S. State Department, 4/19/13)

In 2012, The Qatari Government Restricted Freedom Of Speech, Press And Assembly, Denied Fair Trial To Those Held Under A Terrorism And Protection Of Society Law, And Outlawed Political Parties. "The principal human rights problems were the inability of citizens to change their government peacefully, restriction of fundamental civil liberties, and pervasive denial of expatriate workers' rights. The monarch-appointed government prohibited organized political parties and restricted civil liberties, including freedoms of speech, press, and assembly and access to a fair trial for persons held under the Protection of Society Law and Combating Terrorism Law." ("Country Reports On Human Rights Practices For 2012: Qatar," U.S. State Department, 4/19/13)

The State Department Reported Restrictions On Freedom Of Religion And Movement, And Human Trafficking. "Other continuing human rights concerns included restrictions on the freedoms of religion and movement, as foreign laborers could not freely travel abroad. Trafficking in persons, primarily in the labor and domestic worker sectors, was a problem. Legal, institutional, and cultural discrimination against women limited their participation in society. The noncitizen 'Bidoon' (stateless persons) who resided in the country with an unresolved legal status experienced social discrimination." ("Country Reports On Human Rights Practices For 2012: Qatar," U.S. State Department, 4/19/13)

2011

According To The 2011 U.S. State Department Report On Human Rights Practices For Qatar, Legal, Institutional And Cultural Discrimination Against Women Restricted Their Participation In Society. "Legal, institutional, and cultural discrimination against women limited their participation in society." ("2011 Human Rights Report: Qatar," U.S. State Department, 5/24/12)

The Main Human Rights Problems Were The Restriction Of Civil Liberties, The Inability Of Citizens To Change Their Government And "Pervasive" Denial Of Worker's Rights. "The principal human rights problems were the inability of citizens to peacefully change their government, restriction of fundamental civil liberties, and pervasive denial of workers' rights. Despite the constitution's establishment of the right of association, the monarch-appointed government prohibited organized political life and restricted civil liberties, including freedoms of speech, press, and assembly and access to a fair trial for persons held under the Protection of Society Law and Combating Terrorism Law." ("2011 Human Rights Report: Qatar," U.S. State Department, 5/24/12)

Restrictions On Freedom Of Religion And Movement And Trafficking In Persons Were Also Human Rights Concerns. "Other continuing human rights concerns included restrictions on freedom of religion and movement, as foreign laborers could not freely travel abroad. Trafficking in persons, primarily in the labor and domestic worker sectors, was a problem. Legal, institutional, and cultural discrimination against women limited their participation in society. The unresolved legal status of 'Bidoons' (stateless persons with residency ties) resulted in social discrimination against these noncitizens." ("2011 Human Rights Report: Qatar," U.S. State Department, 5/24/12)

2010

According To The 2010 U.S. State Department Report On Human Rights Practices For Qatar, Legal, Institutional And Cultural Discrimination Against Women Restricted Their Participation In Qatari Society. "Legal, institutional, and cultural discrimination against women limited their participation in society. The unresolved legal status of 'Bidoons' (stateless persons with residency ties) resulted in discrimination against these noncitizens. Authorities severely restricted worker rights, especially for foreign laborers and domestic servants." ("2010 Human Rights Report: Qatar," U.S. State Department, 4/8/11)

The Main Human Rights Concerns Were Prolonged Detentions, The Restrictions Of Civil Liberties And The Inability Of Citizens To Change Their Government. "Citizens lacked the right to change the leadership of their government by election. There were prolonged detentions in crowded facilities, often ending with deportation. The government placed restrictions on civil liberties, including freedoms of speech, press (including the Internet), assembly, association, and religion. Foreign laborers faced restrictions on travel abroad. Trafficking in persons, primarily in the labor and domestic worker sectors, was a problem. Legal, institutional, and cultural discrimination against women limited their participation in society. The unresolved legal status of 'Bidoons' (stateless persons with residency ties) resulted in discrimination against these noncitizens. Authorities severely restricted worker rights, especially for foreign laborers and domestic servants." ("2010 Human Rights Report: Qatar," U.S. State Department, 4/8/11)

2009

According To The 2009 U.S. State Department Report On Human Rights Practices For Qatar, Legal, Institutional And Cultural Discrimination Restricted Women's Participation In Society. "Legal, institutional, and cultural discrimination against women limited their participation in society. The unresolved legal status of 'Bidoons' (stateless persons with residency ties) resulted in discrimination against these noncitizens. Authorities severely restricted worker rights, especially for foreign laborers and domestic servants." ("2009 Human Rights Report: Qatar," U.S. State Department, 3/11/10)

Other Human Rights Problems Included Restrictions On Civil Liberties And Prolonged Detention. "Citizens lacked the right to change the leadership of their government by election. There were prolonged detentions in overcrowded and harsh facilities, often ending in deportation. The government placed restrictions on civil liberties, including freedoms of speech, press (including the Internet), assembly, association, and religion. Foreign laborers faced restrictions on foreign travel. Trafficking in persons, primarily in the labor and domestic worker sectors, was a problem. Legal, institutional, and cultural discrimination against women limited their participation in society. The unresolved legal status of 'Bidoons' (stateless persons with residency ties) resulted in discrimination against these noncitizens. Authorities severely restricted worker rights, especially for foreign laborers and domestic servants." ("2009 Human Rights Report: Qatar," U.S. State Department, 3/11/10)

Saudi Arabia

As Of 2016, The Kingdom Of Saudi Arabia Has Donated Between $10,000,001 And $25,000,000 To The Clinton Foundation, Making A New Donation In 2014. (Clinton Foundation, Accessed 3/16/16)

As Of 2016, Friends Of Saudi Arabia Has Donated Between $1,000,001 And $5,000,000 To The Clinton Foundation. (Clinton Foundation Accessed 3/15/16)

Saudi Arabia Joined Russia's March 2015 Attempt To Overturn UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon's Expansion Of Staff Benefits To Same-Sex Couples

On March 24, 2015, Russia Failed In Its Attempt To Overturn United Nations' Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon's Decision To Extend Staff Benefits To Same-Sex Couples On The UN's Staff. "Russia failed on Tuesday in a bid to stop the United Nations extending staff benefits to all same-sex couples after a U.N. General Assembly budget committee voted 80 to 43 against the proposal. There were 37 abstentions and 33 countries did not vote. U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said in July that the United Nations would recognize all same-sex marriages of its staff, allowing them to receive U.N. benefits." (Michelle Nicholls, "Russia Fails In Bid To Stop UN Staff Benefits For All Gay Couples," Reuters, 3/24/15)

  • "Previously, Staff Members' Personal Status Was Determined By The Laws Of Their Country Of Nationality." "Previously, staff members' personal status was determined by the laws of their country of nationality. But the United Nations now recognizes all same-sex couples married in a country where it is legal, regardless of their nationality." (Michelle Nicholls, "Russia Fails In Bid To Stop UN Staff Benefits For All Gay Couples," Reuters, 3/24/15)

"Saudi Arabia, China, Iran, India, Egypt, Pakistan, And Syria Were Among The Countries That Voted In Favor Of Russia's Proposal." (Michelle Nicholls, "Russia Fails In Bid To Stop UN Staff Benefits For All Gay Couples," Reuters, 3/24/15)

  • "'The Kingdom Of Saudi Arabia Does Not Support The Expansion Of Benefits For Same-Sex Couples Because Saudi Arabia Believes These Relationships Are Morally Unacceptable,' A Saudi Diplomat Told The U.N. Committee." (Michelle Nicholls, "Russia Fails In Bid To Stop UN Staff Benefits For All Gay Couples," Reuters, 3/24/15)

According To BuzzFeed, Saudi Arabia Was The Only Nation To Speak In Favor Of Russia's Position. "Only one country speaking in favor of Russia's draft, Saudi Arabia, directly tied their position to being against LGBT rights, saying they backed the draft 'because Saudi Arabia believes these relationships are morally unacceptable.'" (Hayes Brown, "Russia's Bid To Curtail LGBT Benefits At The U.N. Fails," BuzzFeed, 3/24/15)

2012

In 2011 National Elections In Saudi Arabia, "Women Were Not Candidates And Did Not Vote." "In September 2011 the country held elections on a nonparty basis for half of the 1,632 seats on the 285 municipal councils around the country. Independent polling station observers identified no irregularities with the election; however, women were not candidates and did not vote. Security forces reported to civilian authorities." ("Country Reports On Human Rights Practices For 2012: Saudi Arabia," U.S. State Department, 4/19/13)

The State Department Also Report Violence Against Women And Discrimination Based On Gender, Religion And Race. "Violence against women, trafficking in persons, and discrimination based on gender, religion, sect, race, and ethnicity were common." ("Country Reports On Human Rights Practices For 2012: Saudi Arabia," U.S. State Department, 4/19/13)

Human Rights Problems In Saudi Arabia Included "Pervasive" Restrictions On Freedom Of Expression, Assembly And Religion, And "A Lack Of Equal Rights For Women, Children, And Expatriate Workers." "The most important human rights problems reported included citizens' lack of the right and legal means to change their government; pervasive restrictions on universal rights such as freedom of expression, including on the Internet, and freedom of assembly, association, movement, and religion; and a lack of equal rights for women, children, and expatriate workers." ("Country Reports On Human Rights Practices For 2012: Saudi Arabia," U.S. State Department, 4/19/13)

The State Department Report Noted The Holding Of Political Prisoners, Arbitrary Arrest And Detention, Denial Of Due Process And Interference "With Privacy, Home And Correspondence." "Other human rights problems reported included torture and other abuses; overcrowding in prisons and detention centers; holding political prisoners and detainees; denial of due process; arbitrary arrest and detention; and arbitrary interference with privacy, home, and correspondence." ("Country Reports On Human Rights Practices For 2012: Saudi Arabia," U.S. State Department, 4/19/13)

In 2012, The Saudi Arabian Government Executed A Man For "Practicing Witchcraft And Sorcery." "On June 19, officials beheaded Muree bin Ali al-Asiri in the southern province of Najran for 'practicing witchcraft and sorcery' and 'for owning written talismans.' According to press reports, officials executed bin Ali al-Asiri after the Supreme Judicial Council upheld his sentence." ("Country Reports On Human Rights Practices For 2012: Saudi Arabia," U.S. State Department, 4/19/13)

2011

According To The 2011 U.S. State Department Report On Human Rights Practices For Saudi Arabia, The Most Pervasive Human Rights Included "A Lack Of Equal Rights For Women And Children," Pervasive Restrictions On Freedom Of Expression, And The Inability Of Citizens To Change Their Government. "The most important human rights problems reported included citizens' lack of the right and legal means to change their government; pervasive restrictions on universal rights such as freedom of expression, including on the Internet, and freedom of assembly, association, movement, and religion; and a lack of equal rights for women and children, as well as for workers." ("2011 Human Rights Report: Saudi Arabia," U.S. State Department, 5/24/12)

  • Violence Against Women And Gender Discrimination Were Common. "Violence against women, trafficking in persons, and discrimination on the basis of gender, religion, sect, race, and ethnicity were common." ("2011 Human Rights Report: Saudi Arabia," U.S. State Department, 5/24/12)

Other Human Rights Abuses Included Torture, Holding Political Prisoners, Arbitrary Arrest, Human Trafficking And Discrimination Along Lines Of Gender, Religion, Sect, Race And Ethnicity. "Other human rights problems reported included torture and other abuses, poor prison and detention center conditions, holding political prisoners and detainees, denial of due process and arbitrary arrest and detention, and arbitrary interference with privacy, home, and correspondence. Violence against women, trafficking in persons, and discrimination on the basis of gender, religion, sect, race, and ethnicity were common. Lack of governmental transparency and access made it difficult to assess the magnitude of many reported human rights problems." ("2011 Human Rights Report: Saudi Arabia," U.S. State Department, 5/24/12)

Although Some Officials Who Committed Abuses Were Punished, There Were Still Reports Of Impunity For Government Officials. "The government prosecuted and punished a limited number of officials who committed abuses, particularly those engaged in or complicit with corruption. There were reports that some members of the security forces and other senior officials, including those linked to the royal family, committed abuses with impunity." ("2011 Human Rights Report: Saudi Arabia," U.S. State Department, 5/24/12)

2010

According To The 2010 U.S. State Department Report On Human Rights Practices For Saudi Arabia, Violence Against Women And Lack Of Equal Rights For Women Were Common. "Violence against women and a lack of equal rights for women, violations of the rights of children, trafficking in persons, and discrimination on the basis of gender, religion, sect, and ethnicity were common. The lack of workers' rights, including the employment sponsorship system, remained a severe problem." ("2010 Human Rights Report: Saudi Arabia," U.S. State Department, 4/8/11)

Other Human Rights Problems Reported Included Torture, Arbitrary Arrest, Denial Of A Fair Trial, Restrictions On Civil Liberties And Human Trafficking. "The following significant human rights problems were reported: no right to change the government peacefully; torture and physical abuse; poor prison and detention center conditions; arbitrary arrest and incommunicado detention; denial of fair and public trials and lack of due process in the judicial system; political prisoners; restrictions on civil liberties such as freedoms of speech (including the Internet), assembly, association, movement, and severe restrictions on religious freedom; and corruption and lack of government transparency. Violence against women and a lack of equal rights for women, violations of the rights of children, trafficking in persons, and discrimination on the basis of gender, religion, sect, and ethnicity were common. The lack of workers' rights, including the employment sponsorship system, remained a severe problem." ("2010 Human Rights Report: Saudi Arabia," U.S. State Department, 4/8/11)

2009

According To The 2009 U.S. State Department Report On Human Rights Practices For Saudi Arabia, Women Faced Violence And Discrimination. "Violence against women, violations of the rights of children, and discrimination on the basis of gender, religion, sect, and ethnicity were common. The employment sponsorship system limited the rights of foreign workers and remained a severe problem." ("2009 Human Rights Report: Saudi Arabia," U.S. State Department, 3/11/10)

Torture, Arbitrary Arrest, Lack Of Due Process, Political Imprisonment And A Restriction Of Civil Liberties Were Reported. "During the year the following significant human rights problems were reported: no right to change the government peacefully; disappearances; torture and physical abuse; poor prison and detention center conditions; arbitrary arrest and incommunicado detention; denial of public trials and lack of due process in the judicial system; political prisoners; restrictions on civil liberties such as freedoms of speech (including the Internet), assembly, association, movement, and severe restrictions on religious freedom; and corruption and lack of government transparency. Violence against women, violations of the rights of children, and discrimination on the basis of gender, religion, sect, and ethnicity were common. The employment sponsorship system limited the rights of foreign workers and remained a severe problem." ("2009 Human Rights Report: Saudi Arabia," U.S. State Department, 3/11/10)

United Arab Emirates

As Of 2016, The United Arab Emirates Donated Between $1,000,001 And $5,000,000 To The Clinton Foundation, Making A New Donation In 2014. (Clinton Foundation, Accessed 3/15/16)

As Of 2016, The Zayed Family, The Ruling Family Of The United Arab Emirates, Has Donated Between $1,000,001 And $5,000,000 To The Clinton Foundation. (Rania Abouzeid, "Abu Dhabi Death Could Spark A Dynastic Struggle," Time, 3/30/10; Clinton Foundation , Accessed 3/15/16)

2012

According To The 2012 U.S. State Department Report On Human Rights Practices For The United Arab Emirates, Domestic Abuse And Violence Were Human Rights Problems While Women Faced Legal And Societal Discriminations. "Domestic abuse and violence against women remained problems; however, police and social workers began to address the problems in close coordination, with the presence of social workers at police stations to communicate in private with victims of violence. The government also conducted programs to raise awareness of these problems throughout the year. Women and noncitizens faced legal and societal discrimination." ("Country Reports On Human Rights Practices For 2012: United Arab Emirates," U.S. State Department, 4/19/13)

The Most Significant Human Rights Problems Included Arbitrary Arrests, Restrictions On Civil Liberties And The Inability Of Citizens To Change Their Government. " The three most significant human rights problems were arbitrary arrests, incommunicado detentions, and lengthy pretrial detentions; limitations on citizens' civil liberties (including the freedoms of speech, press, assembly, and association); and citizens' inability to change their government." ("Country Reports On Human Rights Practices For 2012: United Arab Emirates," U.S. State Department, 4/19/13)

Other Human Rights Concerns Included Police And Prison Guard Brutality, Invasion Of Privacy And Reports Of Corruption. "Other human rights problems included reports of police and prison guard brutality. The government continued to interfere with citizens' privacy rights, and placed some limits on freedom of movement. Although there were limited reports of corruption, the government lacked transparency and there was a lack of judicial independence. Domestic abuse and violence against women remained problems; however, police and social workers began to address the problems in close coordination, with the presence of social workers at police stations to communicate in private with victims of violence. The government also conducted programs to raise awareness of these problems throughout the year. Women and noncitizens faced legal and societal discrimination. Trafficking in persons continued, as did discrimination against persons with disabilities. Legal and societal discrimination against persons with HIV/AIDS and based on sexual orientation and sexual identity remained a problem. The government restricted worker rights, including the rights of foreign workers. Forced labor was a problem, although the government took steps to combat it. Mistreatment of foreign domestic servants and other migrant workers, including sexual abuse, remained a problem." ("Country Reports On Human Rights Practices For 2012: United Arab Emirates," U.S. State Department, 4/19/13)

2011

According To The 2011 U.S. State Department Report On Human Rights Practices For The United Arab Emirates, Domestic Abuse Of Women Continued While Women Faced "Legal And Societal Discrimination." "Domestic abuse of women remained a problem; however, police and social workers addressed the issue in close coordination, with the presence of social workers at police stations to communicate in private with victims of violence. Women and noncitizens faced legal and societal discrimination." ("2011 Human Rights Report: United Arab Emirates," U.S. State Department, 5/24/12)

The Main Human Rights Problems Were The Restriction Of Civil Liberties, The Lack Of Judicial Independence And The Inability Of Citizens To Change Their Government. "Three core human rights issues continue to be of concern: citizens' inability to change their government; limitations on citizens' civil liberties (including the freedoms of speech, press, assembly, and association); and lack of judicial independence. Although the government took steps to expand political participation, political parties are not permitted. The government continued to interfere with privacy and to restrict civil liberties, including usage of the Internet. Capacity and structural issues leave the judiciary susceptible to political influence." ("2011 Human Rights Report: United Arab Emirates," U.S. State Department, 5/24/12)

Human Rights Problems Also Included Police And Prison Guard Brutality And Trafficking Persons. "In contrast with 2010, there were no reports of torture during the year, and there were no reports that flogging was employed as judicially sanctioned punishment. There were, however, reports of police and prison guard brutality during the year. Arbitrary and incommunicado detention remained a problem. Although there were limited reports of corruption, the government lacked transparency. Domestic abuse of women remained a problem; however, police and social workers addressed the issue in close coordination, with the presence of social workers at police stations to communicate in private with victims of violence. Women and noncitizens faced legal and societal discrimination. Trafficking in persons continued, the government restricted the rights of foreign workers, and abuse of foreign domestic servants and other migrant workers remained a problem." ("2011 Human Rights Report: United Arab Emirates," U.S. State Department, 5/24/12)

2010

According To The 2010 U.S. State Department Report On Human Rights Practices For The United Arab Emirates, Domestic Abuse Against Women, Sometimes Enabled By The Police, And Legal And Societal Discrimination Against Women Were Reported. "Domestic abuse of women remained a problem, and there were allegations that police sometimes enabled domestic abuse. Legal and societal discrimination against women and noncitizens was pervasive. Trafficking in persons continued, the government severely restricted the rights of foreign workers, and abuse of foreign domestic servants remained problematic." ("2010 Human Rights Report: United Arab Emirates," U.S. State Department, 4/8/11)

Other Human Rights Problems Included Arbitrary Detention, The Restriction Of Civil Liberties And Unverified Reports Of Torture. "Citizens did not have the right to change their government. There were unverified reports of torture during the year, and security forces sometimes employed flogging as judicially sanctioned punishment. Arbitrary and incommunicado detention remained a problem. The judiciary lacked independence. The government interfered with privacy and restricted civil liberties, including freedoms of speech, press (including the Internet), assembly, association, and religion. There were limited reports of corruption, and the government lacked transparency. Domestic abuse of women remained a problem, and there were allegations that police sometimes enabled domestic abuse. Legal and societal discrimination against women and noncitizens was pervasive. Trafficking in persons continued, the government severely restricted the rights of foreign workers, and abuse of foreign domestic servants remained problematic." ("2010 Human Rights Report: United Arab Emirates," U.S. State Department, 4/8/11)

2009

According To The 2009 U.S. State Department Report On Human Rights Practices For The United Arab Emirates, Domestic Abuse Against Women, Sometimes Enabled By The Police, And Legal And Societal Discrimination Against Women Were Reported. "Domestic abuse of women remained a problem, and there were allegations that police sometimes enabled domestic abuse. Legal and societal discrimination against women and noncitizens was pervasive. Trafficking in persons continued, the government severely restricted the rights of foreign workers, and abuse of foreign domestic servants was common." ("2009 Human Rights Report: United Arab Emirates," U.S. State Department, 3/11/10)

Other Human Rights Problems Included Unverified Reports Of Torture, Arbitrary Detention And Restrictions On Civil Liberties Were Reported. "Citizens did not have the right to change their government. There were unverified reports of torture during the year, and security forces sometimes employed flogging as judicially sanctioned punishment. Arbitrary and incommunicado detention remained a problem. The judiciary lacked full independence. The government interfered with privacy and restricted civil liberties, including freedom of speech, press (including the Internet), assembly, association, and religion. There were limited reports of corruption, and the government lacked transparency. Domestic abuse of women remained a problem, and there were allegations that police sometimes enabled domestic abuse. Legal and societal discrimination against women and noncitizens was pervasive. Trafficking in persons continued, the government severely restricted the rights of foreign workers, and abuse of foreign domestic servants was common." ("2009 Human Rights Report: United Arab Emirates," U.S. State Department, 3/11/10)


Previous post

The Un-Democratic Party

Next post

For 162 Seconds, Clinton Lies
Republican National Committee

Connect With Us

Republican National Committee
Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel
News & Videos
  • 310 First Street SE, Washington, DC 20003
  • 202-863-8500

By providing your phone number, you are consenting to receive calls and SMS/MMS msgs, including autodialed and automated calls and texts, to that number from the Republican National Committee. Msg&data rates may apply. Terms & conditions/privacy policy apply 80810-info.com.

Paid for by the Republican National Committee. Not Authorized By Any Candidate Or Candidate's Committee. www.gop.com

By providing your phone number, you are consenting to receive calls and SMS/MMS msgs, including autodialed and automated calls and texts, to that number from the Republican National Committee. Msg&data rates may apply. Terms & conditions/privacy policy apply 80810-info.com.

Paid for by the Republican National Committee.
Not Authorized By Any Candidate Or Candidate's Committee. www.gop.com