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Top 10 Things Hillary Doesn't Want You To See

- October 7, 2016

Leaked Transcripts Of Hillary Clinton's Closed Door Paid Speeches Reveal What Clinton's Title Should Actually Be: (D-Wall Street)


TOP TAKEAWAYS

  • Clinton said that to be "successful, politically" you "need both a public and private position" on public policy.
  • In a speech to a Wall Street audience, Clinton went to great lengths to shift blame from the big banks, divulging that she allowed her constituents to "literally yell" at her to take out their anger for the financial crisis.
  • Clinton confessed in the Big Banks that she was "far removed" from the "struggles of the middle class" because of her and Bill's "fortunes."
  • To the Big Banks, Clinton said that Wall Street insiders are needed to solve the problems on Wall Street.
  • Clinton bragged that as a Senator she did all she could do to make sure the financial industry "continued to prosper…"
  • Clinton confided in the Big Banks that she feels there is a "bias against people who have led successful and/or complicated lives…"
  • In front of a Brazilian bank, Clinton cited that her "dream is hemispheric common market with open trade and open borders."
  • In front of a Canadian audience, Clinton said she hopes the US can model ours after their system.
  • In front of a Big Bank, Clinton bragged about her "great relationship" with the financial sector and about how much "respect" she has for the industry.

#1 CLINTON SAID TO A CLOSED DOOR AUDIENCE THAT TO BE "SUCCESSFUL, POLITICALLY" YOU "NEED BOTH A PUBLIC AND PRIVATE POSITION" ON PUBLIC POLICY

Clinton Said Behind Closed Doors That In Order To Be "Successful, Politically" You Need To Have "Both A Public And Private Position" On Public Policy. CLINTON: "You just have to sort of figure out how to - getting back to that word, 'balance' - how to balance the public and the private efforts that are necessary to be successful, politically, and that's not just a comment about today. That, I think, has probably been true for all of our history, and if you saw the Spielberg movie, Lincoln, and how he was maneuvering and working to get the 13th Amendment passed, and he called one of my favorite predecessors, Secretary Seward, who had been the governor and senator from New York, ran against Lincoln for president, and he told Seward, I need your help to get this done. And Seward called some of his lobbyist friends who knew how to make a deal, and they just kept going at it. I mean, politics is like sausage being made. It is unsavory, and it always has been that way, but we usually end up where we need to be. But if everybody's watching, you know, all of the back room discussions and the deals, you know, then people get a little nervous, to say the least. So, you need both a public and a private position. And finally, I think - I believe in evidence-based decision making. I want to know what the facts are. I mean, it's like when you guys go into some kind of a deal, you know, are you going to do that development or not, are you going to do that renovation or not, you know, you look at the numbers. You try to figure out what's going to work and what's not going to work." (TCARRK@HillaryClinton.com, Speech For National Multi-Housing Council, 4/24/13, Email To Clinton Campaign Communications Staff, 2/8/16)

#2 SPEAKING AT A BRAZILIAN BANK CLINTON SAID HER "DREAM IS A HEMISPHERIC COMMON MARKET WITH OPEN TRADE AND OPEN BORDERS"

Clinton Said Her "Dream Is A Hemispheric Common Market With Open Trade And Open Borders…" CLINTON: "My dream is a hemispheric common market, with open trade and open borders, some time in the future with energy that is as green and sustainable as we can get it, powering growth and opportunity for every person in the hemisphere." (TCARRK@HillaryClinton.com, Remarks to Banco Itau, 5/16/13, Email To Clinton Campaign Communications Staff, 2/8/16)

#3 CLINTON WENT TO GREAT LENGHTS TO SHIFT THE BLAME OF THE FINANCIAL CRISIS AWAY FROM THE BIG BANKS

Clinton Said It Was "Simplistic" To Blame The Banking System For The Recession And That Blaming The Banking System "Could Have Been Avoided." CLINTON: "That was one of the reasons that I started traveling in February of '09, so people could, you know, literally yell at me for the United States and our banking system causing this everywhere. Now, that's an oversimplification we know, but it was the conventional wisdom. And I think that there's a lot that could have been avoided in terms of both misunderstanding and really politicizing what happened with greater transparency, with greater openness on all sides, you know, what happened, how did it happen, how do we prevent it from happening? You guys help us figure it out and let's make sure that we do it right this time. And I think that everybody was desperately trying to fend off the worst effects institutionally, governmentally, and there just wasn't that opportunity to try to sort this out, and that came later." (TCARRK@HillaryClinton.com, Goldman Sachs AIMS Alternative Investments Symposium, 10/24/13, Email To Clinton Campaign Communications Staff, 2/8/16)

#4 CLINTON EMPATHISED WITH THE BIG BANKS BEHIND CLOSED DOORS SAYING SHE WAS "FAR REMOVED" FROM THE "STRUGGLES OF THE MIDDLE CLASS" BECAUSE OF HER AND BILL'S "FORTUNES"

Clinton Admitted At A Bankers Conference That Her And Bill Are "Far Removed" From The "Struggles Of The Middle Class" Because Of Their "Fortunes." CLINTON: "And I am not taking a position on any policy, but I do think there is a growing sense of anxiety and even anger in the country over the feeling that the game is rigged. And I never had that feeling when I was growing up. Never. I mean, were there really rich people, of course there were. My father loved to complain about big business and big government, but we had a solid middle class upbringing. We had good public schools. We had accessible health care. We had our little, you know, one-family house that, you know, he saved up his money, didn't believe in mortgages. So I lived that. And now, obviously, I'm kind of far removed because the life I've lived and the economic, you know, fortunes that my husband and I now enjoy, but I haven't forgotten it." (TCARRK@HillaryClinton.com, Remarks at Goldman-Black Rock, 2/4/14, Email To Clinton Campaign Communications Staff, 2/8/16)

#5 TO THE BIG BANKS, CLINTON SUGGESTED THAT WALL STREET INSIDERS WERE NEEDED TO SOLVE THE PROBLEMS WITH WALL STREET

Talking About The "Golden Key" To Regulating Wall Street, Clinton Said The "People Who Know [Wall Street] Better Than Anybody Are The People Who Work In The Industry." CLINTON: "I mean, it's still happening, as you know. People are looking back and trying to, you know, get compensation for bad mortgages and all the rest of it in some of the agreements that are being reached. There's nothing magic about regulations, too much is bad, too little is bad. How do you get to the golden key, how do we figure out what works? And the people that know the industry better than anybody are the people who work in the industry. And I think there has to be a recognition that, you know, there's so much at stake now, I mean, the business has changed so much and decisions are made so quickly, in nano seconds basically. We spend trillions of dollars to travel around the world, but it's in everybody's interest that we have a better framework, and not just for the United States but for the entire world, in which to operate and trade." (TCARRK@HillaryClinton.com, Remarks At Goldman Sachs AIMS Alternative Investments Symposium, 10/24/13, Email To Clinton Campaign Communications Staff, 2/8/16)

Clinton Said That It Is Up To "The Industry Itself," Referring To Wall Street, To "Strengthen Our Economy." CLINTON: "Remember what Teddy Roosevelt did. Yes, he took on what he saw as the excesses in the economy, but he also stood against the excesses in politics. He didn't want to unleash a lot of nationalist, populistic reaction. He wanted to try to figure out how to get back into that balance that has served America so well over our entire nationhood. Today, there's more that can and should be done that really has to come from the industry itself, and how we can strengthen our economy, create more jobs at a time where that's increasingly challenging, to get back to Teddy Roosevelt's square deal. And I really believe that our country and all of you are up to that job." (TCARRK@HillaryClinton.com, Remarks to Deutsche Bank, 10/7/14, Email To Clinton Campaign Communications Staff, 2/8/16)

#6 CLINTON BRAGGED ABOUT HOW AS SENATOR SHE "DID ALL I COULD TO MAKE SURE [THE FINANCE INDUSTRY] CONTINUED TO PROSPER"

Clinton Bragged That As A Senator She "Did All I Could Do To Make Sure [The Finance Industry] Continued To Prosper…" CLINTON: "When I was a Senator from New York, I represented and worked with so many talented principled people who made their living in finance. But even thought I represented them and did all I could to make sure they continued to prosper, I called for closing the carried interest loophole and addressing skyrocketing CEO pay. I also was calling in '06, '07 for doing something about the mortgage crisis, because I saw every day from Wall Street literally to main streets across New York how a well-functioning financial system is essential. So when I raised early warnings about early warnings about subprime mortgages and called for regulating derivatives and over complex financial products, I didn't get some big arguments, because people sort of said, no, that makes sense. But boy, have we had fights about it ever since." (TCARRK@HillaryClinton.com, Remarks at Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd, Email To Clinton Campaign Communications Staff, 2/8/16)

#7 CLINTON SAID THERE WAS A "BIAS AGAINST PEOPLE WHO HAVE LED SUCCESSFUL AND/OR COMPLICATED LIVES"

In Front Of A Wall Street Bank, Clinton Said That There Is A "Bias Against People Who Have Led Successful And/Or Complicated Lives…" CLINTON: "Yeah. Well, you know what Bob Rubin said about that. He said, you know, when he came to Washington, he had a fortune. And when he left Washington, he had a small…" CEO OF GOLDMAN SACHS LLOYD BLANKFEIN: "That's how you have a small fortune, is you go to Washington." CLINTON: "You go to Washington. Right. But, you know, part of the problem with the political situation, too, is that there is such a bias against people who have led successful and/or complicated lives. You know, the divestment of assets, the stripping of all kinds of positions, the sale of stocks. It just becomes very onerous and unnecessary." (TCARRK@HillaryClinton.com, Remarks At Goldman Sachs Builders And Innovators Summit, 10/29/13, Email To Clinton Campaign Communications Staff, 2/8/16)

#8 CLINTON TOLD WALL STREET SHE NEEDS THEIR MONEY FOR HER CAMPAIGNS

Clinton Told A Big Bank That "Running For Office In Our Country Takes A Lot Of Money" And That People "Should Ask Some Tough Questions Before Handing Over Campaign Contributions…" CLINTON: "Secondly, running for office in our country takes a lot of money, and candidates have to go out and raise it. New York is probably the leading site for contributions for fundraising for candidates on both sides of the aisle, and it's also our economic center. And there are a lot of people here who should ask some tough questions before handing over campaign contributions to people who were really playing chicken with our whole economy." (TCARRK@HillaryClinton.com, Remarks To Goldman Sachs AIMS Alternative Investments Symposium, 10/24/13, Email To Clinton Campaign Communications Staff, 2/8/16)

#9 IN FRONT OF A BIG BANK AUDIENCE, CLINTON BRAGGED ABOUT HER "GREAT RELATIONSHIP" WITH THE FINANCIAL SECTOR AND ABOUT HOW MUCH RESPECT SHE HAS FOR THE INDUSTRY

In Front Of A Big Bank, Clinton Bragged About Her "Great Relationship" With The Financial Industry And That She Has "A Lot Of Respect For The Work" It Does. QUESTION: "Now, without going over how we got to where we are right now, what would be your advice to the Wall Street community and the big banks as to the way forward with those two important decisions?" CLINTON: "Well, I represented all of you for eight years. I had great relations and worked so close together after 9/11 to rebuild downtown, and a lot of respect for the work you do and the people who do it, but I do - I think that when we talk about the regulators and the politicians, the economic consequences of bad decisions back in '08, you know, were devastating, and they had repercussions throughout the world." (TCARRK@HillaryClinton.com, Remarks At Goldman Sachs AIMS Alternative Investments Symposium, 10/24/13, Email To Clinton Campaign Communications Staff, 2/8/16)

#10 IN FRONT OF A CANADIAN AUDIENCE, CLINTON SAID THAT THE US SHOULD MODEL THEIR SYSTEM AFTER OUR NEIGHBORS TO THE NORTH

In Canada, Clinton Said That She Wants America To Get "Universal Healthcare Coverage Like You Have Here In Canada." CLINTON: "You know, on healthcare we are the prisoner of our past. The way we got to develop any kind of medical insurance program was during World War II when companies facing shortages of workers began to offer healthcare benefits as an inducement for employment. So from the early 1940s healthcare was seen as a privilege connected to employment. And after the war when soldiers came back and went back into the market there was a lot of competition, because the economy was so heated up. So that model continued. And then of course our large labor unions bargained for healthcare with the employers that their members worked for. So from the early 1940s until the early 1960s we did not have any Medicare, or our program for the poor called Medicaid until President Johnson was able to get both passed in 1965. So the employer model continued as the primary means by which working people got health insurance. People over 65 were eligible for Medicare. Medicaid, which was a partnership, a funding partnership between the federal government and state governments, provided some, but by no means all poor people with access to healthcare. So what we've been struggling with certainly Harry Truman, then Johnson was successful on Medicare and Medicaid, but didn't touch the employer based system, then actually Richard Nixon made a proposal that didn't go anywhere, but was quite far reaching. Then with my husband's administration we worked very hard to come up with a system, but we were very much constricted by the political realities that if you had your insurance from your employer you were reluctant to try anything else. And so we were trying to build a universal system around the employer-based system. And indeed now with President Obama's legislative success in getting the Affordable Care Act passed that is what we've done. We still have primarily an employer-based system, but we now have people able to get subsidized insurance. So we have health insurance companies playing a major role in the provision of healthcare, both to the employed whose employers provide health insurance, and to those who are working but on their own are not able to afford it and their employers either don't provide it, or don't provide it at an affordable price. We are still struggling. We've made a lot of progress. Ten million Americans now have insurance who didn't have it before the Affordable Care Act, and that is a great step forward. (Applause.) And what we're going to have to continue to do is monitor what the costs are and watch closely to see whether employers drop more people from insurance so that they go into what we call the health exchange system. So we're really just at the beginning. But we do have Medicare for people over 65. And you couldn't, I don't think, take it away if you tried, because people are very satisfied with it, but we also have a lot of political and financial resistance to expanding that system to more people. So we're in a learning period as we move forward with the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. And I'm hoping that whatever the shortfalls or the glitches have been, which in a big piece of legislation you're going to have, those will be remedied and we can really take a hard look at what's succeeding, fix what isn't, and keep moving forward to get to affordable universal healthcare coverage like you have here in Canada." (TCARRK@HillaryClinton.com, Remarks For tinePublic - Saskatoon, CA, 1/21/15, Email To Clinton Campaign Communications Staff, 2/8/16)


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