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UPDATE: it's getting *really* negative, nancy.

Michael Ahrens - September 14, 2017

Eeek – now even CA Dems want to see Nancy Pelosi replaced as leader. This poll from UC Berkeley just popped…

Sacramento Bee: California Democrats growing tired of Nancy Pelosi. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, who won an eighth term leading the Democratic caucus last fall, should be replaced regardless of whether her party regains control of Congress’ lower chamber in next year’s elections, according to a new poll. The statewide survey of California Democrats by UC Berkeley’s Institute of Governmental Studies found only 30 percent believe House Democrats should choose Pelosi to stay on as their leader should they win back the House of Representatives in 2018. Some 44 percent prefer somebody else taking over, while the remainder have no opinion.

 

 

From: Michael Ahrens - Communications/Research
Sent: Tuesday, August 15, 2017 12:48 PM
To: Michael Ahrens - Communications/Research
Subject: FW: it's getting pretty negative, nancy.

Kansas Democrat Paul Davis, the failed 2014 gubernatorial candidate, just announced that he’s running for Congress in KS-2, a district the DCCC is targeting in 2018. (Kansans rejected Davis, an Obama DNC delegate, because he was a liberal legislator with a long record of voting for higher taxes and more spending. And they’ll reject him again.)

But what’s particularly noteworthy is Davis’ decision to pair his campaign launch with a condemnation of Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi. After McClatchy could only find ONE candidate in 2018 target races who would state support for Pelosi remaining leader of their caucus, House Democrats should ask themselves: How much longer are we willing to stand by our increasingly-unpopular leader?

Kansas City Star: Kansas Democrat Paul Davis announces congressional bid, says he won’t vote for Pelosi. “Democrat Paul Davis announced his entrance into the race for the 2nd District congressional seat Tuesday morning. If elected, he said, he does not plan to vote for Rep. Nancy Pelosi, the current House Democratic leader and former speaker of the U.S. House when Democrats last held the majority.Asked what he sees as a defining issue of the campaign, Davis said, “It’s really who’s going to change the culture of Washington, D.C.” “Are we going to have somebody who is a problem solver who is willing to go across the aisle and engage Republicans and really tackle the problems that I think people want to see us tackle?” Davis said. “Or are we going to have somebody who’s just going to be there with a bullhorn, providing more noise in a political environment that just doesn’t need any more of that?”

 

From: Michael Ahrens - Communications/Research
Sent: Thursday, August 3, 2017 4:00 PM
To: Michael Ahrens - Communications/Research
Subject: it's getting pretty negative, nancy.

In a scathing indictment of Leader Nancy Pelosi, McClatchy’s Alex Roarty could only find ONE candidate running in House Democrats’ 2018 target races who would state support for Pelosi remaining leader of the House Democratic Caucus.

While Pelosi is still singing her own praises (yes, there’s video) as a “master legislator” and a “strategically, politically-astute leader…recognized by many around the country,” it seems as if fewer and fewer Democrats agree.

Democrats begin to see Pelosi as a 2018 problem

McClatchy

Alex Roarty

August 3, 2017 – 2:11 PM

http://bit.ly/2vtXeud

Nancy Pelosi might actually be in trouble.

In a survey of 20 Democratic House candidates, only one – a former Senate staffer from Orange County, California – would state support for the congresswoman staying on as leader of the House Democratic Caucus. Of the rest, 18 declined to say if Pelosi should keep her job, while one, a political newcomer from a culturally conservative Ohio district, said he would vote for someone other than Pelosi.

Their refusal is a remarkable development for an already embattled minority leader. But even more significant are the implications that their refusal carries for next year’s midterm elections.

Democrats are eager to win a majority buoyed by voters’ disapproval of President Donald Trump. But Pelosi’s own deep unpopularity has proven a major hindrance to Democrats in recent campaigns. After Democrats lost a special election in June, some party insiders blamed Pelosi directly.

We are overdue for a new generation of leadership,” said Kenneth Harbaugh, a candidate in Ohio’s 7th Congressional District, and the only candidate surveyed who was a hard no on voting for Pelosi as leader. “We have a remarkable opportunity in front of us, and it’s going to take new thinking and new leadership to capitalize on it.”

President Putin probably has a better approval rating in Georgia than Nancy Pelosi,” said David Kim, a candidate in Georgia’s 7th Congressional District. Kim’s district neighbors Georgia’s 6th District, where Democratic candidate Jon Ossoff delighted liberals earlier this year with his unexpectedly strong bid to win a traditional Republican stronghold in the Atlanta suburbs.

"We need leadership change," New York Democratic Rep. Kathleen Rice, who has been critical of Pelosi in the past, told CNN in the aftermath of that loss. "It's time for Nancy Pelosi to go, and the entire leadership team."

Ossoff’s loss and Pelosi’s role in it weigh heavily on Democrats – so much so that her role as a rainmaker for candidates nationwide is no longer enough to motivate would-be lawmakers to talk about supporting the House leader.

A spokesman for Chrissy Houlahan, running in Pennsylvania’s 6th District, said “she needs to get elected first and is focused on her own race.” Andrea Ramsey, running in Kansas 3rd Congressional District, said “Kansas voters aren’t concerned about hypothetical DC insider politics.”

Democratic candidate Jason Crow said his “only focus is the people of Colorado’s 6th District and what they need from their representative.” And Debbie Mucarsel-Powell, seeking the Democratic nomination in Florida’s 26th Congressional District, said she “hadn’t met” Pelosi.

Each of their districts is among House Democrats’ top targets of 2018, the kind of competitive races where Pelosi could be a severe liability. Polls show the Democratic leader is deeply unpopular: 53 percent of voters have a negative view of her, according to a June poll from Quinnipiac University. Just 27 percent of them have a favorable opinion.

Republicans intend to exploit that, promising to make Pelosi an issue even for Democrats who will not declare their support for her leadership.

“Democratic candidates and their ties to Nancy Pelosi will be an issue in every single competitive race next fall,” said Matt Gorman, spokesman for the National Republican Congressional Committee. “Whether or not they claim to vote for her as speaker, they’ll be another vote for her and her big-spending policies in congress.”

Only one Democratic candidate contacted said he would support Pelosi — Kia Hamadanchy, running in California’s 45th Congressional District.

To read more, click here.


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